Thursday, October 14, 2010

Majoriti Orang Melayu Menghalalkan Korupsi

Majoriti Orang Melayu Menghalalkan Korupsi


Majoriti Orang Melayu Menghalalkan Korupsi

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 03:33 PM PDT

Dari pengalaman saya bercakap dengan ramai orang Melayu, rata- rata orang Melayu tidak berapa marah dan benci dengan korupsi. Walaupun mereka ada yang benci dengan UMNO namun apabila ditanya berkaitan dengan amalan2 korupsi, mereka boleh menerima dengan tiada rasa takut ataupun rasa takut akan halal atau haram.

Saya juga membuat deduksi bahwa rata-rata orang Melayu tidak menjadikan Islam sebagai panduan sangat dalam masaalah korupsi, salah guna kuasa, nepotisma dan kronisma. Bagi mereka dalam bab memakan harta rakyat ataupun mengkayakan diri dengan menyalah guna harta rakyat, itu bukan perkara yang ada kaitan dengan halal ataupun haram.

Orang Melayu sudah begitu lama duduk di bawah UMNO menyebabkan majoriti orang Melayu tidak

Sebagai contoh, hari ini saya bertemu dengan beberapa orang Melayu dan makan bersama. Saya membuka cerita bagaimana saya mendapat maklumat seorang ahli lembaga pengarah salah sebuah anak syarikat GLC mendapat gaji puluhan ribu sebulan. Beliau berjaya mendapat gaji sebanyak itu kerana bapanya adalah salah seorang Lembaga Pengarah GLC tersebut walaupun umurnya belum sampai 40 tahun.

Salah seorang yang makan dengan saya itu berkaya kalau beliau mendapat peluang beliau pun akan membantu anak beliau sebegitu.

Saya tidak membalas, tapi saya hairan, tidakkan orang Melayu risau rezeki yang diberikan kepada anak cucu mereka samada rezeki itu haram atau halal? Masyarakat Melayu tidak kesah halal haram dalam perkara berkaitan amanah, perlantikan, gaji dan juga kontrak. Yang penting dapat gaji, dapat pangkat, dapat darjat. Halal dan haram nombor dua.

Ungkapan2 seperti "kalau aku dapat peluang, aku pun ambik" adalah sangat biasa didengari di kalangan orang Melayu.

PENGARUH UMNO MASIH MENEBAL DALAM MASYARAKAT MELAYU

UMNO sedari mula kewujudan mereka sudah mencampur adukan halal dan haram. Sudahkah kita lupa aktiviti ekonomi UMNO yang pertama adalah Loteri UMNO 1951? Ertinya, semenjak 1951 lagi UMNO telah melatih orang MElayu tidak memperdulikan halal haram dalam perkara berkaitan mata pencarian atau sumber pendapatan.

YAng penting, ada sumber wang masuk tidak kira wang tersebut halal atau haram.

Jadi, tak hairanlah amalan korupsi begitu berleluasa di kalangan orang Melayu dan Islam. Secara tidak sedar, setelah dipimpin UMNO sedari lima puluh tahun dahulu, orang Melayu telah kabur perbatasan antara halal dan haram.

Amalan2 haram di dalam mencari sumber pendapatan dilihat sebagai PELUANG KEEMASAN dan bukannya dibenci sebagai perkara yang diharamkan oleh Allah SWT.

Saya cuma takut penyakit yang sama juga melanda penyokong2 PAS dan Pakatan Rakyat terutama mereka yang dahulunya UMNO. Kadang-kadang unsur UMNO itu masih kuat melekat dalam diri-diri mereka sehingga terbawa-bawa perkara tersebut dalam parti baru mereka.

Sehingga ada kesedaran di kalangan orang MElayu terhadap halal haram dalam sumber pendapatan mereka, maka sehingga itulah masaalah korupsi ini tidak selesai.

Selagi korupsi wujud, selagi itu orang Melayu ekal terkebelakang dalam ekonomi Malaysia.

Tulang Besi




Uncultured Minister Datuk Seri Dr Rais Yatim.if you have balls come Engage Malaysiatoday about thick-skinned politics this taxidriver is waiting

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 11:42 AM PDT

About thick-skinned politics
Photobucket


READ THIS MY NAME IS RAISE SON OF YATIM 1Malaysia concept such political ideology should not be allowed or encouraged is waste of taxpayer money

 



The last time Malaysiakini sat down for a chat with Anwar Ibrahim, he was the man of the hour.

Fresh from a string of victories in the 2008 general election, he was then about to leave for Permatang Pauh to make his political comeback.

 

[obamajjclowncopy-1.jpg]
Bayan Baru MP mr Asshole Zahrain Hashim has attackedMalaysiakini over its report on arecent seminar in Washington last month, which he attended alongside top government officials.

 

Governments don't like uneasy questions. Criticism or suggestion is like water off a duck's back to them. What's more exasperating is how bullheaded politicians can get when there's an outcry against what they do. Nothing can pierce their rhino-hide.
Much has been written about the overbearing manner of some ministers in recent months. Some are politely stubborn, some brazenly rude and a couple of others frazzle us with their stony silence.
There couldn't have been a better time for satirists and lampoonists and many have, indeed, blunted their pencils on the job. But you pine to look for sharper, more pungent comments on this theatre of the absurd, something that's appropriately wacky, and like the course of events, stops tantalizingly short of the climax. Just like our mantris skip, skirt or stonewall issues and show an unwillingness to carry forward an argument.
Wish we had a Daniil Kharms around. Kharms, the pen-name of Daniil Ivanovich Yuvachov, wrote short absurdist stories and children's tales in the Stalinist era. He lived in penury and hunger and was finally confined to the psychiatric ward of a Leningrad prison. His preposterous and comic stories end as they are being told. Just the right genre for tales about today's political bosses and their general insensitivity.
Here are three parables inspired by Kharms but minus the macabre. Needless to say all characters are fictitious and any resemblance to real persons, living or dead, is purely imagined.
The antics of Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR) leaders, particularly Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim, in criticising their own country abroad do not reflect good leadership qualities, said Information Communication and Culture Minister Datuk Seri Dr Rais Yatim.
"We should look back at history and the world leaders because none of the world leaders had gone out of their country to criticise their own homeland," he told reporters after opening the Simpang Pertang bamboo craft incubator centre, near here today.


RELATED ARTICLE TAN SRI MUHYIDDIN YASSIN STRESSED THAT MALAYSIA PRACTISED UMNO DEMOCRACY AND HAD IT OWN LAWS AND WELL-MANAGED LEGAL SYSTEM UMNO STYLE,

related article← The malaysian governtment did the unthinkable, Augustine PauL Federal Court judge GOT THIS POSITION TRU corruption' Farah Azlina had no access to vital information' The prosecution in the Anwar Ibrahim sodomy trial has reiterated that it operates on a "need-to-know" basis. readmore clock below IZZAH; ANNWAR IS STILL A THREAT TO BARISAN GHANI … Read more

 

 

Sex needs to be spontaneous and only then does it completely fulfill and please one. Here are three steps that will guarantee ultimate sexual pleasure.readmore Farah Azlina Latif sex with complainant

 
 
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      THEY'RE SNEAKY. THEY LIE. THEY'RE EVIL. THEY THINK EVERYONE ELSE IS AN ANIMAL AND THEREFORE WITHOUT SOULS. THEY'RE THE MOST DESPICABLE PEOPLE ON THE PLANET TO SAY THE LEAST. THESE EVIL DOERS ARE BEHIND HOLLYWOOD, THE PORN INDUSTRY, RACE MIXING,THE HOMOSEXUAL AGENDA …. YOU NAME IT … AND THEY'RE THE ONES ORCHESTRATING

       

       

       

     

     

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


our tag line UMNO"S LIFELINE IS SAIFOOL'S ASSHOLE NO MORE KRIS WE HAVE ASSHOLE AS OUR DEFENCE

 

related article What's frightening is Anwar is believable while Umno/BN isn't

 

 

 

He said this when commenting on Anwar's interview by TVOne television station in Indonesia yesterday where he belittled the capability of the country's leadership in resolving disputes and problems between the two neighbouring countries by claiming that if he were to become the prime minister, the problems could have been resolved immediately.
Rais, who is the Member of Parliament (MP) for Jelebu, said Anwar as the MP for Permatang Pauh, was earning salary as a Member of Parliament as well as the Opposition Leader.
"As the Opposition Leader, it does not mean that he has the licence to criticise and belittle his own country. He (Anwar) has a responsibility just like Prime Minister Datuk Seri Mohd Najib Tun Razak is responsible for the country.
"Thus, when he has criticised, to me his marks as a leader have dropped very low," he said.
Meanwhile, he said Kraftangan Malaysia would promote the construction of houses using bamboo in several areas.
"We at the ministry, particularly through Kraftangan Malaysia will first of all draw up several plans for kampung houses which we can use as centres for our decorative products in several districts and we will highlight the beauty of bamboo products which we can use as construction materials for houses. — Bernama
Clockwork
A thirsty man sat down for a drink at a pub in Bangalore and looked at the clock. When he was served his second drink, the clock struck 11. Another man came in, ordered his drink and sat watching the clock. When the second man was served his second drink the clock struck 11.30. A third man came in just then, ordered his drink and hid his wrist-watch in his pocket. A fourth man came in seconds later and banged his fist on the clock.
That's it. Now let's go out and watch that family sipping nimbu pani in their car parked by the roadside and talk of ticking bombs and moral hours.
The Warrior
Once upon a time there was a knight who fought all the looters of the royal treasury. He fought them all one by one and recovered all the gold, diamonds and pearls. He threw them out one by one, through the palace gates. And when he turned, the dogs barked. One by one, they clambered up the wall behind him and took their gilded thrones again. The knight mounted his horse…
Within seconds, the gates opened and a carriage laden with groceries entered. Somebody spoke of preparation for a grand feast to celebrate the kingdom's anniversary and somebody else replied in hushed tones that a courtier was charged of sexual misconduct.
Always Ahead
K was driving back into town with his family after a weekend outing. Just around the bend he saw a speeding white car behind them and jammed the brakes.
"Why on earth did you stop to give way?" his wife asked.
"That's the government and it should always be ahead," said K with sly grin.
Even before they crossed the next milestone, the big white car blocked K's way. Two burly men pulled him out from the car, kicked and abused him. "No smirks, the government is always right," they thundered.
The lights went out and the story had to be abandoned midway. The telephone rang and the government declared: "There is sufficient light at the end of the tunnel."


Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah absurd parables about thick-skinned politics“cynical political plays“the stench of corruption”

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 11:39 AM PDT



I don't know about you. I am embarrassed that after fifty years of independence we are still talking about bringing Malaysians together. I would have wished that by now, and here tonight, we could be talking about how we can conquer new challenges together.


relatedarticle



Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah a miraculous rebirth by offering himself as candidate UMNO's Man for Galas

 

By Leslie Lau
Consultant Editor

KUALA LUMPUR, July 10 – On the eve of the prime minister's first 100 days in office, Umno veteran Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah said tonight that Malaysians should evaluate 1 Malaysia against issues like "the fact of constitutional failure in Perak" and "the stench of corruption" in the Port Klang Free Zone (PKFZ) project.

Tengku Razaleigh, who made an unsuccessful bid to contest the Umno presidency, also asked Malaysians to consider the "cynical political plays on racial unity against assurances that national unity is the priority," when judging the Barisan Nasional (BN) government elected into power last March.

The former finance minister also gave short shrift to the PM's economic reforms, and argued for a "Malaysian New Deal" without race based considerations in order for the country to be talent-driven and competitive.

Datuk Seri Najib Razak marks 100 days in office as prime minister tomorrow. In that time he has put in place reforms in the capital markets and released a number of Internal Security Act detainees.

But he has also presided over a major crackdown on dissent while the Perak power grab saga continues to be played out.

In recent days, one of his most ardent backers Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad also began to criticise the current government, particularly on the reversal of the policy to teach science and mathematics in English.

Speaking to public relations consultants at a dinner here tonight, Tengku Razaleigh pointed out that the current government was elected into power on March 8, 2008, and not 100 days ago.

He also argued that Najib had effectively been in power since last year when Tun Abdullah Badawi's departure schedule had been announced.

"The issues before the present BN government are not transformed overnight with a change of the man at the top," he said.

In a scathing criticism of the BN government, he cited the recommendations made in 2004 by the Royal Commission to Enhance the Operations and Management of the Police and pointed out that despite the allocation of RM9 billion as a result of the panel's conclusion, "there has been no dent on our crime problem."

"Security is about more than just catching criminals out there. It is also about the integrity of our own people and processes.

"It is above all about uprooting corruption and malpractice in government agencies, especially in law enforcement agencies," he said.

The key recommendation of the panel, he pointed out, was the formation of an Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission, but it had been shelved.

Citing another example, he said the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the Lingam video clip "might as well have not been conducted" because its findings had been completely ignored.

Tengku Razaleigh said that Malaysians should start trusting "less in personalities and more in policies."

"Look less to politics and more to principles, less to rhetoric and more to tangible outcomes, less to the government of the day and more to enduring institutions," he said.

In his speech, the former finance minister also spoke at length about the country's affirmative action policies, the NEP and how he felt embarrassed that after 50 years of independence, "we are still talking about bringing Malaysians together."

"Curiously, although the policy was formulated … for a finite period, in our political consciousness it has grown into an all encompassing and permanent framework that defines who we are.

"The NEP ended in 1991 when it was terminated and replaced by the New Development Policy, but eighteen years on, we are still in its hangover and speak confusingly about liberalising it."

He said that it was a crushing indictment of the mediocrity of leadership that the NEP is considered sacrosanct and that departures from it are big strides.

"The NEP is over and we have not had the courage to tell people this."

In a veiled attack against his own party, Tengku Razaleigh pointed out that the NEP had been systematically appropriated by a small political and business class to enrich itself and perpetuate power.

"We must break the stranglehold of communal politics and racial policy if we want to be a place where an economy driven by ideas and skills can flourish.

"We can do much better than cling to the bright ideas of 40 years ago as if they were dogma, and forget our duty to come up with the bright ideas for our own time.

"We need a Malaysian New Deal based on the same universal concerns on which the NEP was originally formulated, but designed for a new era."

The Umno veteran also called for a fair and equitable political and economic order, founded on equal citizenship which he said was the only possible basis for a united Malaysia and a talent-driven economy.

 


Tengku Tan Sri Razaleigh Hamzah

1. Thank you for inviting me to address you. It's a pleasure to be here, and to learn from you. You have asked me to talk about Najib's First 100 Days, and this lecture is in a series called Straight Talk. I shall indeed speak plainly and directly.

2. Let me begin by disappointing you. I am not going to talk about Najib's First 100 Days because it makes little sense to do so.

3. Our governments are brought to power for five year terms through general elections. The present government was constituted after March 8, 2008 and Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak's tenure as Prime Minister resulted from a so-called "smooth transfer of power" between the previous Prime Minister and himself that took a somewhat unsmooth twelve months to carry out. During those months, Najib took on the de facto leadership role domestically while Abdullah warmed our international ties. The first 100 days of this government went by unremarked sometime in June last year.

4. Not only is it somewhat meaningless to talk about Najib's First 100 days, such talk buys into a kind of political silliness that we are already too prone to. It has us imagine that the present government started work on April 2 and forget that it commenced work on March 8 last year and must be accountable for all that has been done or not done since then. It has us forget that in our system of parliamentary, constitutional democracy, governments are brought to power at general elections and must be held accountable for promises made at these elections. It leads us to forget that these promises, set out in election manifestos, are undertaken by political parties, not individuals, and are not trifles to be forgotten when there is a change of individual.

5. It is important that we remember these things, cultivate a more critical recollection of them, and learn to hold our leaders accountable to them, so that we are not perpetually chasing the slogan of the day, whether this be Vision 2020, Islam Hadhari or 1Malaysia. As PR Professionals, you would see my point immediately. Slogans without substance undermine trust. That substance is made up of policies that have been thought through and are followed through. That substance is concrete and provided by results we can measure.

6. Whether or not some of our leaders are ready for it, we are maturing as a democracy. We are beginning to evaluate our governments more by the results they deliver over time than by their rhetoric. As our increasingly well-educated and well-travelled citizens apply this standard, they force our politicians to think before they speak, and deliver before they speak again. As thinking Malaysians we should look for the policies, if any, behind the slogans. What policies are still in place and which have we abandoned? What counts as policy and who is consulted when it is made? How is a proposal formulated and specified and approved before it becomes policy, and by whom? What are the roles of party, cabinet, King and Parliament in this process? Must we know what it means before it is instituted or do we have to piece it together with guesswork? Do we even have a policy process?

7. The mandate Najib has taken up is the one given to Barisan Nasional under Abdullah Badawi's leadership. BN was returned to power in the 12th General Elections on a manifesto promising Security, Peace and Prosperity. It is this manifesto against which the present administration undertook to be judged. The present government inherits projects and policies such as Islam Hadhari and Vision 2020. If these are still in place, how do they relate to each other and to 1 Malaysia? How do we evaluate the latest slogan against the fact of constitutional failure in Perak, the stench of corruption in the PKFZ project and reports of declining media freedom? What do we make of cynical political plays on racial unity against assurances that national unity is the priority?

8. It is not amiss to ask about continuity. We were told that the reason why we had to have a yearlong 'transfer of power' to replace the previous Prime Minster was so that we could have such policy continuity. The issues before the present BN government are not transformed overnight with a change of the man at the top.

9. Let me touch on one issue every Malaysian is concerned with: security. The present government made the right move in supporting the establishment of the Royal Commission to Enhance the Operations and Management of the Police in 2004. Responding to the recommendations of the Royal Commission, the government allocated the PDRM RM8 billion to upgrade itself under the 9th Malaysia Plan, a tripling of their allocation under the 8th Malaysia Plan.

10. Despite the huge extra amounts we are spending on policing, there has been no dent on our crime problem, especially in the Johor Bahru area, where it continues to make a mockery of our attempts to develop Iskandar as a destination for talent and investment. Despite spending all this money, we have just been identified as a major destination for human trafficking by the US State Department's 2008 Human Rights Watch. We are now in the peer group of Sudan, Saudi Arabia and North Korea for human trafficking. All over the world the organized cross-border activity of human trafficking feeds on the collusion of crime syndicates and corrupt law enforcement and border security officials. Security is about more than just catching the criminals out there. It is also about the integrity of our own people and processes. It is above all about uprooting corruption and malpractice in government agencies, especially in law enforcement agencies. I wish the government were as eager to face the painful challenge of reform as to spend money. The key recommendation of the Royal Commission was the formation of an Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission. That has been shelved.

11. Royal Commissions and their findings are not to be trifled with and applied selectively. Their findings and recommendations are conveyed in a report submitted to the King, who then transmits them to the Government. Their recommendations have the status of instructions from the King. The recommendations of the Royal Commission on the Police have not been properly implemented. The Royal Commission of Inquiry into the Lingam Video clip might as well not have been conducted, because its findings have been completely ignored. Both Commissions investigated matters fundamental to law and order in this country: the capability and integrity of the police and of the judiciary. No amount of money thrown at the PDRM or on installing CCTV's can make up for what happens to our security when our law enforcers and our judges are compromised.

12. Two Royal Commissions undertaken under the present government unearthed deep issues in the police and the judiciary and made recommendations with the King's authority behind them, and they have been ignored. The public may wonder if the government is committed to peace and security if it cannot or will not address institutional rot in law enforcement and the rule of law.

13. The reform of the police and the judiciary has been on the present government's To Do list for more than five years.

14. I want to reflect now upon where we stand today and how we might move forward. We are truly at a turning point in our history. Our political landscape is marked with unprecedented uncertainty. Nobody knows what the immediate future holds for us politically. This is something very new for Malaysians. The inevitability of a strong BN government figured into all political and economic calculations and provided a kind of stability to our expectations. Now that this is gone, and perhaps gone for good, we need a new basis for long-term confidence. No matter who wins the next General Election, it is likely to be with a slim majority. Whatever uncertainty we now face is likely to persist unless some sort of tiebreaker is found which gathers the overwhelming support of the people.

15. We need to trust less in personalities and more in policies, look less to politics and more to principle, less to rhetoric and more to tangible outcomes, less to the government of the day and more to enduring institutions, first among which must be the Federal Constitution.

16. We need an unprecedented degree of openness and honesty about what our issues are and what can be done; about who we are, and where we want to go. We need straight talk rather than slogans. We need to be looking the long horizon rather than occupying ourselves with media-generated milestones.

17. Those of us who think about the future of Malaysia have never been so restless. The mould of our past is broken, and there is no putting it back together again, but a new mould into which to pour our efforts is not yet cast. This is a time to think new thoughts, and to be courageous in articulating them.

18. Such is the case not just in politics but also in how the government manages the economy. In a previous speech I argued that for our economy to escape the "middle income trap" we need to make a developmental leap involving transformative improvements in governance and a successful reform of our political system. I said the world recession is a critical opportunity for us to re-gear and re-tool the Malaysian economy because it is a challenge to take bold, imaginative measures. We must make that leap or remain stuck as low achievers who were once promising.

19. We are in a foundational crisis both of our politics and of our economy. In both dimensions, the set plays of the past have taken us as far as they can, and can take us no further. Politically and economically, we have arrived at the end of the road for an old way of managing things. The next step facing us is not a step but a leap, not an addition to what we have but a shift that changes the very ground we play on.

20. This is not the first time in our brief history as an independent nation that we have found ourselves at an impasse and come up with a ground-setting policy, a new framework, a leap into the future. The race riots of 1969 ended the political accommodation and style of the first era of our independence. Parliament was suspended and a National Operations Council put in place under the leadership of the late Tun Razak. He formed a National Consultative Council to study what needed to be done. The NCC was a non-partisan body which included everyone. It was the NCC that drafted and recommended the New Economic Policy. This was approved and implemented by the Government.

21. The NEP was a twenty year programme. It had a national, and not a racial agenda to eradicate poverty and address structural inequality in the form of the identification of race with occupation. It aimed to remove a colonial era distribution of economic roles in our economy. Nowhere in its terms is any race specified, nor does it privilege one race over another. Its aim was unity.

22. The NEP's redistributive measures drew on principles of social justice, not claims of racial privilege. This is an important point. The NEP was acceptable to all Malaysians because its justification was universal rather than sectarian, ethical rather than opportunistic. It appealed to Malaysians' sense of social justice and not to any notion of racial privilege.

23. We were devising a time-limited policy for the day, in pursuit of a set of measurable outcomes. We were not devising a doctrine for an eternal socio-economic arrangement. Like all policies, it was formulated to solve a finite set of problems, but through an enduring concern with principles such as equity and justice. I happen to think it was the right thing for the time, and it worked in large measure.

24. Curiously, although the policy was formulated within the broad consensus of the NCC for a finite period, in our political consciousness it has grown into an all-encompassing and permanent framework that defines who we are. We continue to act and talk as if it is still in place. The NEP ended in 1991 when it was terminated and replaced by the New Development Policy, but eighteen years on, we are still in its hangover and speak confusingly about liberalizing it. The NEP was necessary and even visionary in 1971, but it is a crushing indictment of our lack of imagination, of the mediocrity of our leadership, that two decades after its expiry, we talk as if it is the sacrosanct centre of our socio-political arrangement, and that departures from it are big strides. The NEP is over, and we have not had the courage to tell people this. The real issue is not whether the NEP is to be continued or not, but whether we have the imagination to come up with something which better serves our values and objectives, for our own time.

25. Policies are limited mechanisms for solving problems. They become vehicles for abuse when they stay on past their useful life. Like political or corporate leaders who have stayed too long, policies that overrun their scope or time become entrenched in abuse, and confuse the means that they are with the ends that they were meant to serve. The NEP was formulated to serve the objective of unity. That objective is enduring, but its instrument can come up for renewal or replacement. Any organisation, let alone a country, that fails to renew a key policy over forty years in a fast-moving world is out of touch and in trouble.

26. There is a broad consensus in our society that while the NEP has had important successes, it has now degenerated into a vehicle for abuse and inefficiency. Neither the Malays nor the non-Malays approve of the way it now works, although there would be multiracial support for the objectives of the NEP, as originally understood. The enthusiasm with which recent reforms have been greeted in the business and international communities suggests that the NEP is viewed as an obstacle to growth. This was not what it was meant to be.

27. It was designed to promote a more equitable and therefore a more harmonious society. Far from obstructing growth, the stability and harmony envisaged by the NEP would were to be the basis for long term prosperity.

28. Over the years, however, and alongside its successes, the NEP has been systematically appropriated by a small political and business class to enrich itself and perpetuate its power. This process has corrupted our society and our politics. It has corrupted our political parties. Rent-seeking practices have choked the NEP's original intention of seeking a more just and equitable society, and have discredited the broad nation-building enterprise which this policy was meant to serve.

29. Thus, while the NEP itself has expired, we live under the hangover of a policy which has been skewed from its intent. Instead of coming up with better policy tools in pursuit of the aims behind the NEP, a set of vested interests rallies to defend the mere form of the NEP and to extend its bureaucratic sway through a huge apparatus of commissions, agencies, licenses and permits while its spirit has been evacuated. In doing so they have clouded the noble aims of the NEP and racialized its originally national and universal concerns.

30. We must break the stranglehold of communal politics and racial policy if we want to be a place where an economy driven by ideas and skills can flourish. This is where our daunting economic and political challenges can be addressed in one stroke. We can do much better than cling to the bright ideas of forty years ago as if they were dogma, and forget our duty to come up with the bright ideas for our own time. The NEP, together with the Barisan coalition, was a workable solution for Malaysia forty years ago. But forty years ago, our population was about a third of what it is today, our economy was a fraction the size and complexity that it is now, and structured around the export of tin and rubber rather than around manufacturing, services and oil and gas. Forty years ago we were in the midst of the Cold War, and the Vietnam War raged to the north. Need I say we live in a very different world today. We need to talk to the facebook generation of young Malaysians connected to global styles and currents of thought. We face global epidemics, economic downturns and planetary climate change.

31. We can do much better than to cling to the outer form of an old policy. Thinking in these terms only gives us the negative policy lever of "relaxing" certain rules, when what we need is a new policy framework, with 21st century policy instruments. We have relaxed some quotas. We have left Approved Permits and our taxi licensing system intact. We have left the apparatus of the NEP, and a divisive mindset that has grown up around it, in place. Wary of well-intentioned statements with no follow-through, the business community has greeted these reforms cautiously, noting that a mountain of other reforms are needed. One banker was quoted in a recent news article as saying: "All the reforms need to go hand in hand..Why is there an exodus of talent and wealth? It is because people do not feel confident with the investment climate, security conditions and the government in Malaysia. Right now, many have lost faith in the system."

32. The issues are intertwined. Our problems are systemic and rooted in the capability of the government to deliver, and the integrity of our institutions. It is clear that piecemeal "liberalization" and measure by measure reform on a politicized timetable is not going to do the job.

33. What we need is a whole new policy framework, based on a comprehensive vision that addresses root problems in security, institutional integrity, education and government capability. What we need to do is address our crisis with the bold statecraft from which the NEP itself originated, not cling to a problematic framework that does little justice to our high aspirations. The challenge of leadership is to tell the truth about our situation, no matter how unpalatable, to bring people together around that solution, and to move them to act together on that solution.

34. If the problem is really that we face a foundational crisis, then it is not liberalization of the NEP, or even liberalization per se that we need. From the depths of the global economic slowdown it is abundantly clear that the autonomous free market is neither equitable nor even sustainable. There is no substitute for putting our heads together and coming up with wise policy. We need a Malaysian New Deal based on the same universal concerns on which the NEP was originally formulated but designed for a new era: we must continue to eradicate poverty without regard for race or religion, and ensure that markets serve the people rather than the other way around.

35. Building on the desire for unity based social justice that motivated the NEP in 1971, let us assist 100% of Malaysians who need help in improving their livelihoods and educating their children. We want the full participation of all stakeholders in our economy. A fair and equitable political and economic order, founded on equal citizenship as guaranteed in our Constitution, is the only possible basis for a united Malaysia and a prerequisite of the competitive, talent-driven economy we must create if we are to make our economic leap.

36. If we could do this, we would restore national confidence, we would bring Malaysians together in common cause to build a country that all feel a deep sense of belonging to. We would unleash the kind of investment we need, not just of foreign capital but of the loyalty, effort and commitment of all Malaysians.

37. I don't know about you. I am embarrassed that after fifty years of independence we are still talking about bringing Malaysians together. I would have wished that by now, and here tonight, we could be talking about how we can conquer new challenges together.

"StraightTalk"
8pm July 10, 2009

 





Let me begin by disappointing you. I am not going to talk about Najib's First 100 Days because it makes little sense to do so.

3. Our governments are brought to power for five year terms through general elections. The present government was constituted after March 8, 2008 and Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak's tenure as Prime Minister resulted from a so-called "smooth transfer of power" between the previous Prime Minister and himself that took a somewhat unsmooth twelve months to carry out. During those months, Najib took on the de facto leadership role domestically while Abdullah warmed our international ties. The first 100 days of this government went by unremarked sometime in June last year.

4. Not only is it somewhat meaningless to talk about Najib's First 100 days, such talk buys into a kind of political silliness that we are already too prone to. It has us imagine that the present government started work on April 2 and forget that it commenced work on March 8 last year and must be accountable for all that has been done or not done since then. It has us forget that in our system of parliamentary, constitutional democracy, governments are brought to power at general elections and must be held accountable for promises made at these elections. It leads us to forget that these promises, set out in election manifestos, are undertaken by political parties, not individuals, and are not trifles to be forgotten when there is a change of individual.

5. It is important that we remember these things, cultivate a more critical recollection of them, and learn to hold our leaders accountable to them, so that we are not perpetually chasing the slogan of the day, whether this be Vision 2020, Islam Hadhari or 1Malaysia. As PR Professionals, you would see my point immediately. Slogans without substance undermine trust. That substance is made up of policies that have been thought through and are followed through. That substance is concrete and provided by results we can measure.

 

"The issues before the present BN government are not transformed overnight with a change of the man at the top," he said.

In a scathing criticism of the BN government, he cited the recommendations made in 2004 by the Royal Commission to Enhance the Operations and Management of the Police and pointed out that despite the allocation of RM9 billion as a result of the panel's conclusion, "there has been no dent on our crime problem."

"Security is about more than just catching criminals out there. It is also about the integrity of our own people and processes.

"It is above all about uprooting corruption and malpractice in government agencies, especially in law enforcement agencies," he said.

The key recommendation of the panel, he pointed out, was the formation of an Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission, but it had been shelved.

Citing another example, he said the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the Lingam video clip "might as well have not been conducted" because its findings had been completely ignored.

Tengku Razaleigh said that Malaysians should start trusting "less in personalities and more in policies."

"Look less to politics and more to principles, less to rhetoric and more to tangible outcomes, less to the government of the day and more to enduring institutions," he said.

In his speech, the former finance minister also spoke at length about the country's affirmative action policies, the NEP and how he felt embarrassed that after 50 years of independence, "we are still talking about bringing Malaysians together."

"Curiously, although the policy was formulated … for a finite period, in our political consciousness it has grown into an all encompassing and permanent framework that defines who we are.

"The NEP ended in 1991 when it was terminated and replaced by the New Development Policy, but eighteen years on, we are still in its hangover and speak confusingly about liberalising it."

He said that it was a crushing indictment of the mediocrity of leadership that the NEP is considered sacrosanct and that departures from it are big strides.

"The NEP is over and we have not had the courage to tell people this."

In a veiled attack against his own party, Tengku Razaleigh pointed out that the NEP had been systematically appropriated by a small political and business class to enrich itself and perpetuate power. readmore click below


The Najib Tun Razak government and the United Malays National Organization (Umno) came under attack from former Finance Minister Tengku Razaleigh who urged the nation to do without 'communal policies' and racial based politics.

In a veiled attack against his own party, Tengku Razaleigh pointed out that the NEP had been systematically appropriated by a small political and business class to enrich itself and perpetuate power.

"We must break the stranglehold of communal politics and racial policy if we want to be a place where an economy driven by ideas and skills can flourish.

"We can do much better than cling to the bright ideas of 40 years ago as if they were dogma, and forget our duty to come up with the bright ideas for our own time.

"We need a Malaysian New Deal based on the same universal concerns on which the NEP was originally formulated, but designed for a new era."

The Umno veteran also called for a fair and equitable political and economic order, founded on equal citizenship which he said was the only possible basis for a united Malaysia and a talent-driven economy.

Tengku Razaleigh pointed out that the current government was elected into power on March 8, 2008, and not 100 days ago.

He also argued that Najib had effectively been in power since last year when Tun Abdullah Badawi's departure schedule had been announced.

"The issues before the present BN government are not transformed overnight with a change of the man at the top," he said.

In a scathing criticism of the BN government, he cited the recommendations made in 2004 by the Royal Commission to Enhance the Operations and Management of the Police and pointed out that despite the allocation of RM9 billion as a result of the panel's conclusion, "there has been no dent on our crime problem."

"Security is about more than just catching criminals out there. It is also about the integrity of our own people and processes.

"It is above all about uprooting corruption and malpractice in government agencies, especially in law enforcement agencies," he said.

The key recommendation of the panel, he pointed out, was the formation of an Independent Police Complaints and Misconduct Commission, but it had been shelved.

Citing another example, he said the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the Lingam video clip "might as well have not been conducted" because its findings had been completely ignored.

Tengku Razaleigh said that Malaysians should start trusting "less in personalities and more in policies."

"Look less to politics and more to principles, less to rhetoric and more to tangible outcomes, less to the government of the day and more to enduring institutions," he said.

In his speech, the former finance minister also spoke at length about the country's affirmative action policies, the NEP and how he felt embarrassed that after 50 years of independence, "we are still talking about bringing Malaysians together."

"Curiously, although the policy was formulated … for a finite period, in our political consciousness it has grown into an all encompassing and permanent framework that defines who we are.

"The NEP ended in 1991 when it was terminated and replaced by the New Development Policy, but eighteen years on, we are still in its hangover and speak confusingly about liberalising it."

He said that it was a crushing indictment of the mediocrity of leadership that the NEP is considered sacrosanct and that departures from it are big strides.

"The NEP is over and we have not had the courage to tell people this."

However the good talks and the criticism, Razaleigh's views will not weight much within the Umno, said an oberver to Wfol.tv. The observer added that Razaleigh wanted to 'reform' the Umno but that is tentatmout to Don Quitchot fighting the windmills and losing the battle. "His place is within the opposition, in the Party Keadilaan Rakyat (PKR) and not with Umno," said the observer.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Tengku Razaleigh (left) receives his appointment letter from the PM

 

GUA MUSANG, Oct 14 — Everyone in Umno and Barisan Nasional (BN) is in high spirits to help wrest back the Galas state seat from the opposition in the by-election on Nov 4, says BN Galas by-election director Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah.

Tengku Razaleigh or Ku Li, who is also Gua Musang member of parliament and the Umno division chief, said all quarters must be united and work together with him throughout the by-election campaign to realise the aim.

"We must do our best if there is a contest. I hope we will carry out our campaign work well with the assistance of everyone concerned.

"I've just arrived here (in Gua Musang) today but I've already heard that the branch leaders and others are all geared up for the by-election. God willing, we will start moving our election machinery with the help of all our supporters," he said before attending the Gua Musang Umno division's special meeting, here, today.

Also present were division deputy chief and Nenggiri assemblyman Mohd Yusof Ghani, division Wanita head Datuk Wan Hazani Wan Mohd Noor and its Youth head Bazlan Baharuddin.

Since appointed by-election director, Tengku Razaleigh returned here for the first time, arriving at 4.30pm to prepare BN's machinery for the by-election.

On the special meeting, he said they discussed several matters on the agenda, including the list of proposed candidates for BN in the by-election, but the prime minister (Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak) would make the final decision.

"Anyone can contest for BN in the by-election provided he is an Umno member and qualified to do so," he said.

On speculations that the Umno division secretary Aziz Shamsuddin and Bazlan were among the possible candidates, Tengku Razaleigh said he did not know about that.

The Election Commission has fixed Oct 26 for nomination of candidates and Nov 4 for polling.

The Galas by-election will be held following the death of its assemblyman Che Hashim Sulaima, 46, from PAS, on Sept 27 due to colon cancer. — Bernama

 



Perhimpunan di Pejabat Majlis Peguam Esok

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 07:38 AM PDT

Perhimpunan menghantar nota bantahan terhadap majlis peguam (bar council) di hadapan pejabat bar council, kuala lumpur pada esok 15 okt 2010, selepas solat jumaat.

Perhimpunan itu kononnya bagi membantah kegagalan bar council mengawalselia dan membenteras kegiatan ahli mereka yang menipu anak-anak guam dan melakukan kegiatan jenayah.


Shadow cabinet

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 08:08 AM PDT

The Malaysian Insider - EPF's proposed Plus takeover like 'robbing Peter to pay Paul', says Pua

Tony Pua has pointed out how the government has been paying PLUS nearly a billion ringgit per annum in a highly questionable lop-sided contract where the Malaysian public has been the real loser.

Excuse my pun but it's highway robbery ...

... which brings me to my controversial but apt recommendation, that Tony Pua be appointed by Pakatan Rakyat as the shadow Finance Minister.

I believe Pua is a fitting choice as I have observed how he has been keeping a beady burning brilliant eye on the BN government's profligate spending on such contractual atrocities and dodgy defence acquisitions.

Pakatan Rakyat presents itself to the Malaysian voters as the alternative government in waiting, yet it has been decidedly evasive about its alternative leadership in government, namely the shadow cabinet, giving mealy-mouthed excuses why it hasn't ... or more correctly, won't, can't, dare not!

The real answer why it hasn't done so is the coalition fears the component parties won't be able to agree to a distribution of ministerial portfolios.

My question to them is, if you can't now, how would you be able to when you win the next general election?

And if you fear an inability to negotiate and compromise then aren't you just delaying the inevitable, the disintegration of the coalition on its very moment of victory?

Shouldn't it be far safer to sort this unavoidable issue NOW rather than delay its inevitability? Quite frankly, I don't consider you fit to take over the business of the government of the day if you cannot even resolve this power sharing now!

Here's my choice, and yes, it's a f* compromise:

PM = Anwar Ibrahim (I am sure this is agreed – do I hear murmurs from Pak Haji Hadi?)

DPM = Pak Haji Hadi (I am quite happy for him to occupy this)

Home Affairs = Lim Kit Siang (who has the Kamunting experience)

Defence = Khalid Ibrahim

Health = Pak Haji Nasharudin

Finance = Tony Pua

Foreign Affairs = Zaid Ibrahim

Works = Nizar Jamaluddin

Education = Teresa Kok Dr Rama (just keep it as one ministry) - Dr Rama is better qualified

Youth = Nurul

Agriculture = Salahuddin Ayub

Teresa Kok = Trade

Sivarasa = Law

Mahfuz Omar = Energy & Oil (no more worries about royalty for Kelantan)

So on so forth ... Azmin Ali can be the Minister in the PM's Department wakakaka


Facebook Blocks Malaysian Politically Sensitive Sites

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 07:03 AM PDT

TIME magazine has this to say:

An American may have invented Facebook, but when it comes to social networking, we can't touch Malaysia.

A study showed that Malaysians have the most friends on their social networks, averaging at 233 digital friends per user.

Malaysians were also the heaviest users of social networking sites, spending a whopping nine hours per week on average communicating with their hoards of online friends.

So it is a grave mistake for Facebook to block the publishing rights of the page "Malaysians for Beng Hock".

The administrators of the above-mentioned page have this to say:

The arbitrary and undemocratic governance of Facebook on its users is not only tyrannical in itself, it is open to manipulation by authoritarian regimes to shut down facebook activism by making a lot of or high-powered complaints.

From our knowledge, at least two other politically-critical pages - 'Justice for Beng Bock' and 'save Jamal on Air' pages were also terminated by Facebook without reasons.

As both the death of Beng Hock and sacking of 988 deejay Jamaluddin Ibrahim are highly controversial issues in Malaysia, these raise the legitimate suspicion if such blocking was the outcome of some backdoor crackdown operation on new media, made possible by Facebook's arbitrary governance.

It is entirely expected that our scum-of-the-earth government would pressure Facebook with a request like this, but very surprising that Facebook would accede to that.

After all, Facebook have the highest number of users in Malaysia and you don't want to piss them off.


Red book detention: Nazri unhappy with the police

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 05:13 AM PDT

Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz is seeing red over the recent detention of Bar Council volunteers as they were distributing leaflets on legal awareness last weekend. "I'm very unhappy with it. I don't have the facts before me of what really happened or why they were detained, but it's not right. Full story here: www.malaysiakini.com
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MP: EPF buy-up won't solve Plus 'highway robbery'

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 04:46 AM PDT

Should the government go through with plans for the Employees Provident Fund (EPF) to acquire Plus Expressways Bhd, it would be akin to "robbing Peter to pay Paul", decried Petaling Jaya Utara MP Tony Pua. Full story here: www.malaysiakini.com
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BN gearing for snap polls, says Anwar

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 04:24 AM PDT

The government's latest postponement of the goods and services tax (GST) is a 'major' indicator that snap polls are around the corner, said PKR de facto chief Anwar Ibrahim. Full story here: www.malaysiakini.com
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Azmin: All party problems are my fault, right?

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 04:25 AM PDT

A peeved PKR vice-president Azmin Ali today lashed out at his critics for constantly attacking him and accusing him of "running a cartel" in the run-up to the party elections. "All the party problems are my fault, right? I'm not a member of the election committee. You have to refer to them," said Azmin when met at the Parliament lobby today. Story: www.malaysiakini.com
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'New palace contract given to unqualified crony'

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 03:53 AM PDT

The main contractor appointed to build the new Istana Negara (National Palace) is not fit to handle the multi-million ringgit project, said Parliamentary Opposition Leader Anwar Ibrahim. He said the company, Maya Maju (M) Sdn Bhd, was listed as dormant by the Companies Commission when it was awarded the project by the Public Works Department on Oct 26, 2007. "This company is controlled by a Datuk Man bin Mat who is the former treasurer of the Umno Merbok division," Anwar told at a press conference at the Parliament House lobby today. Full story here: www.malaysiakini.com
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Gobala: There's a hidden hand ...

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 03:57 AM PDT

Padang Serai division (cabang) chief and party VP N Gobalakrishan, claims there is a 'hidden hand' manipulating nomination results for cabang division heads and party positions at the coming party elections. Story: www.malaysiakini.com
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PKR-UMNO, 2 kali 5

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 03:56 AM PDT

PKR tidak belajar dari kesilapan pihak lain, malahan parti ini melakukan lebih besar dari kesalahan pihak lain itu. Pemimpin-pemimpin besar PKR sekarang adalahlah anak-anak kepada UMNO yang bercerai-berai tetapi tidak mahu menjadikan apa yang berlaku didalam UMNO itu sebagai pelajaran tetapi melakukan kesalahan demi kesalahan; lebih besar lagi nampaknya dari semasa mereka didalam UMNO dulu.

Betullah kata orang tua-tua dahulu; 'bagaimana acuan begitulah bentuk kuehnya' atau 'kalau bapa kencing berdiri anak kencing berlari'. Nampaknya penyakit yang dihadapi oleh UMNO begitu 'contagious' sekali; kemana pemimpin-pemimpinnya pergi mereka akan membawa penyakit yang ada kepada mereka sekali dengan mereka dan penyakit itu akan merebak dengan cepat sekali.

Dalam proses pemilihan diperingkat cabang-cabang parti itu baru-baru ini penyakit itu berjangkit dari UMNO dengan nyata sekali. Semalam ramai diantara pemimpin-pemimpin cabang parti itu berdemonstrasi didepan Ibu Pejabat parti itu membantah permainan pemimpin-pemimpin besar mereka yang cuba menolak kemahuan dan kehendak ahli-ahli cabang siapa yang mereka hendak pilih sebagai pemimpin mereka.

Tindakkan Azmin Ali masuk campur didalam pemilihan cabang Hulu Selangor misalnya telah menafikan kemenangan Mohd Nazar Yakin sebagai Ketua Cabang tersebut dan keadaan ini berlaku dibanyak cabang selyuruh negara. Kebanyakkannya dilakukan oleh penyokong Azmin Ali, salah seorang dari Naib Presiden yang akan bertanding sebagai Timbalan Presiden dalam pemilihan pimpinan diperingkat pusat yang akan berlaku tidak lama lagi.

Azmin adalah calun yang Anwar Ibrahim hendak lihat memenangi kerusi Timbalan Presiden parti itu maka sesiapa sahaja yang mirip kepada penentang Azmin seperti Zaid Ibrahim misalnya akan menghadapi tekanan seperti yang kita lihat berlaku sekarang ini.

Dengan cara apa sekali pun Azmin dengan sokongan Anwar mahukan pemimpin-pemimpin dicabang-cabang parti itu adalah 'orangnya' sahaja. Semasa didalam UMNO dahulu ini jugalah permainan Anwar Ibrahim sehinggakan Ghaffar Baba yang penyanding kerusi Timbalan Presiden UMNO gagal untuk mendapatkan cukup pencalunan untuk bertanding dan Anwar mendapat slot kedudukkan sebagai orang nubor 2 dalam UMNO itu tanpa tentangan dari sesiapa. Maka Anwar jadilah Timbalan kepada Dr Mahathir Mohammed dalam UMNO.

Rupa-ruapanya Anwar mendapat banyak pelajaran dari Dr Mahathir bagaimana cara untuk mengekalkan kuasa, dan apabila mereka mempraktikkan 'ilmu' yang sama maka mereka pun berpecah dan Anwar dipecat dan beliau menubuhkan PKR dan mempraktikkan kaedah politik yang sama dengan lebih jelas semata-mata untuk mengekalkan kuasanya tanpa ada pihak yang menentangnya berada dalam parti pmpinannya.

Dialam UMNO dan PKR, inilah penyakit yang tidak ada ubatnya seperti penyakit barah. Selalunya inilah kaedah pemimpin-pemimpin yang lemah untuk memperkuatkan diri mereka. Kalau kita kaji secara halus pemimpin-pemimpin diktator terbentuk dari pemimpin yang lemah.

Tidak semua pemimpin ingin menjadi diktator. Ferdinand Marcos misalnya mengambil alih kuasa melalui demokrasi tetapi apabila demokrasi tidak menjamin beliau akan berkuasa dalam tempuh yang lama, maka secara beransur-ansur Marcos menjadi diktator dan menggunakan kuasa diktatornya itu memerintah Filipina selama lebih dari 2 dekad.

Isterinya Imelda menggunakan kuasa suaminya tanpa halangan kerana suaminya adalah seorang diktator. Imelda menggunakan kesempatan untuk ber'shopping' secara gigl-gilaan sehinggakan barang yang murah dibelinya dengan harga mahal dan apabila Marcos hilang kuasa kerana gerakkan 'people's power' didapati Imelda mempunyai 7000 pasang kasut dan itu semua adalah hasil 'shopping' menggunakan wang rakyat tanpa halangan.

Kita berdoalah agar tidak ada isteri pemimpin-pemimpin kita yang seakan-akan sama dengan Imelda dinegara kita ini. Tetapi saya rasa tidak ada isteri pemimpin seperti itu diMalaysia ini. Tak tahulah jika ada dikalangan kita ternampak isteri pemimpin yang 'glamor' seperti Imelda itu. Mungkin ada yang nampak tetapi saya tak nampak pula. Jika seorang pemimpin itu tidak mampu mengawal kehendak dan keinginan isterinya tanpa kawalan pemimpin itu tidak mungkin boleh megawal politik dan negara dengan baik.

Barulah kita sedar PKR seperti juga UMNO dipimpin oleh pemimpin yang lemah; kerana takut kepada bayang-bayang sendiri, sanggup memecah belahkan parti yang dipimpinnya untuk berkuasa mengikut desakkan nafsu syahwat yang tidak terkawal.

Kesungguhan ahli-ahli untuk memperkuatkan parti keseluruhannya dicacatkan oleh kemahuan peribadi seorang dua pimpinan diibu pejabat parti yang tidak memikirkan kekuatan partinya dalam jangka masa yang panjang. Bagi Azmin kepentingan dia sendiri adalah yang terpenting, kerana parti itu hanya merupakan badan untuk mendapatkan kuasa semata-mata kerana kuasa; bukannya kerana perjuangan yang diretorikkannya siang dan malam.

Akhirnya kita lihat UMNO dan PKR adalah 2 kali 5 sahaja. Mungkin inilah sebabnya rakyat akan memilih batang tubuh pemimpin sahaja kali ini kerana hendak mengharapkan kepada parti tidak lagi cara memilih pemimpin yang relevan yang membawa kebaikkan kepada negara..

Selepas ini kita pilih pemimpin yang berani menyatukan rakyat dan mempunyai rekod cemerlang kepimpinan sahaja. Itu sahaja formula untuk memperbaikki keadaan politik dan siasah negara. Kita cari pemimpin seperti yang saya sebutkan ini. Jika hijab dibukakan tuhan, insyaallah kita akan bertemu dengan pemimpin yang saya maksudkan tadi.

Mungkin pemimpin yang saya maksudkan itu sedang berselindung disebalik cahaya yang terang.


Anurendra Jegadeva's solo exhibition - My God is my Truck

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 02:49 AM PDT

In September 2010, Wei-ling Gallery presented Anurendra Jegadeva's much-awaited solo exhibition entitled 'MY GOD IS MY TRUCK - Heroic Portraiture from the Far Side of Paradise'. For those who missed it, Malaysiakini.tv presents you with an overview of the remarkable artwork with an exclusive interview with the artist himself plus additional interviews with cultural activist Eddin Khoo, academician Farish Noor and the gallery director, Wei Ling. Produced by Indrani Kopal ©2010. Malaysiakini.tv/Rentakini
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'Banduan Akhir di Sel Akhir' - Final performance tonight!

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 01:46 AM PDT

Tonight is the final performance of the stage play on Yong Vui Kong, the young Sabah man who is on death row in Singapore. Yong was found guilty of trafficking in drugs by the Singapore courts and has applied for pardon. Video by Shufiyan shukur
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Side-kick”Sarawak Elections March…??’

Posted: 14 Oct 2010 01:39 AM PDT

CM Taibs 30th year in office falls on 26th March 2010. Many in the blogsphere have so far seen their first prediction of  10/10/10 as the the date the Sarawak elections will be held thrown out of the window. 

It is a known fact that CM Taib does look at all angles before he advises the Governor and the PM that he will dissolve the State assembly to pave the  way for an election. Numerology a vital jigsaw plus others like economic climate and a hosts of other factors will be taken into consideration. 

Earlier even the State Opposition leaders were quoted to have said this,""Election is coming. October or November is a very likely date," said Sarawak DAP chief Wong Ho Leng.

"The signs have become more prominent. Everywhere you go, people are talking about it and it does look very soon, possibly by November," Baru Bian, the state PKR chief, predicted.

See Chee How the State PKR Information chief for PKR Sarawak has already in an inclusive interview to audie61 said,"We are ready,its only CM Taib who is playing the Guessing game."It seems now someone is also getting into the act. Is he trying to tell us Pakatan something? Or could he be the New Side Kick for Taib? What has he seen in his Crystal Ball which Taib has not? 

This was published in mosts of the main stream media and we reposts:-

State election in March or April — SIBU: Second Finance Minister Dato Sri Wong Soon Koh believes the next election would likely be held in March or April next year.

"Personally, I do not think the election will be held this year. It's too early…maybe next March or April," he said.

Wong was responding to reporters' query on whether his latest campaign push in the rural areas was an indication that the election was near.

"To me, going to the ground to gather feedback is always my job and to assure the people that I will continue to serve them to the best of my capabilities," he added.

Wong said he had conducted more than 20 ceramah with the people in the rural areas for the past weeks and the whole intention was to listen to their needs."I received lots of requests from these people, ranging from better bridges to upgrading roads and drainage improvement.

"What the people want, I will do it slowly and I will make sure that all are delivered. However, priority will be given to urgent projects," he said.

ELECTIONS MARCH Hmmm.?? SHARE WITH US YOUR DATE.!!



Bakun Dam: Govt must bear responsibility for possible disaster

Posted: 13 Oct 2010 04:03 PM PDT

From Kua Kia Soong (Suaram), via e-mail

The decision by the developer and manager of the Bakun Dam project, Sarawak Hidro to start the impoundment of the Bakun Dam yesterday is the height of irresponsibility. Only the day before, the people had been told that there has to be seven continuous days of dry weather and water depth of below 60m for it to be safe to flood the dam.

There has been continuous inclement weather in the area which has caused the worst environmental disaster in Sarawak with the 250km logjam the length of the Rajang river, resulting in damage to bridges and villages, disruption to river transport and destruction of fish.

Each day of delay was costing the developers a fortune but the health and safety of the people downstream cannot be compromised just to save cost.

According to The Star: "The flooding was initiated in a somewhat sudden manner at short notice after Sarawak Hidro engineers held a late meeting on Tuesday night and decided that the weather and river conditions were safe enough…"

Sarawak Hidro had gone ahead with the impounding of the dam despite the fact that the Bakun folk had lodged a police report because the issue of compensation for the people affected had not yet been settled although they were resettled 15 years ago. Furthermore, the Emergency Rescue Plan for people living downstream has not been made public.

While the Sarawak state government is acting irresponsiblyly, the Federal government cannot feign ignorance since Sarawak Hidro is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Ministry of Finance Incorporated.

The Bakun Dam had federal endorsement from the very beginning and Dr Mahathir must bear total responsibility for erecting this "second highest concrete rock-filled dam in the world" to show that "Malaysia Boleh".

Despite the opposition by NGO activists as well as dam experts since the 1970s, this project has carried on and with it a litany of disasters for the indigenous peoples as well as Malaysian tax payers as we had warned years ago.

The entire Bakun dam project has been littered with broken promises, environmental assessment reports and experts' opinions ignored and other compromises. We have already witnessed the environmental disaster in recent years but the 250km logjam and dead fish along the Rajang during the last week has been the worst thus far.

With this brazen disregard for safety standards by impounding the dam, the Sarawak state government and the Federal government must bear full responsibility for any future disasters that may happen at this accursed Bakun dam. When it happens, they should not feign ignorance, shed crocodile tears or try and blame God again!

Read:

Fear rises as Bakun Dam gets ready for flooding

Bakun Dam 'is an economic rip-off'

 


Will Gerakan consolidate or will there be a team of rivals?

Posted: 13 Oct 2010 03:57 PM PDT

From Ooi Zhi Yi, via e-mail

In May 18, 1860, four men awaited news from the national convention of the Republican Party in Chicago. Senator William Henry Seward in Auburn, New York, Governor Salmon P Chase in Columbus, Ohio, Edward Bates in St Louis and of course Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, Illinois.

All four of the men were hoping that the other three would falter in their bid for the presidential nomination in the party. Lincoln's rivals had gained good achievements throughout their lives except for Lincoln.

As in the titles in front of their names, Seward is a Senator, Chase a Governor and Edward Bates is a judge. Lincoln, however, is a former one-term congressman who had been twice defeated for election to the Senate and expected to suffer defeat in this presidential nomination.

Neither Seward nor Chase nor Bates seriously considered Lincoln an obstacle to their great ambition. At the time of nomination, Lincoln was the least expected to win the presidential nomination.

By the end of the third ballot of the nomination, Lincoln shocked his rivals who believed the better man had lost. After winning in the presidential nomination in the party, Abraham Lincoln subsequently won in the election to become the 16th President of the United States.

The Republican victory in the presidential elections without a single electoral vote from the 15 slave states provoked seven of them to secede and form the Confederates States of America.

In this crisis, Lincoln took the unparalleled step of appointing all three of his rivals to his cabinet. Seward got the top spot as Secretary of State; Chase became Secretary of the Treasury, and Bates as Attorney General.

Joseph Medill, the editor of the Chicago Tribune, later asked the president why he had made these appointments as they were his rivals. Lincoln replied: "We needed the strongest men of the party in the cabinet. These were the very strongest men. I had no right to deprive the country of their services."

As the internal Republican feuds suggest, the party in the 1860s was a coalition of politicians who only a few years earlier had been Whigs (Lincoln, Seward, Bates), Democrats (Blair, Secretary of the Navy, Gideon Welles and vice president Hannibal Hamlin), Free Soilers (Chase).

In addition, several cabinet members personally disliked each other: Blair and Chase, Seward and Welles, Chase and Seward, Blair and Secretary of War Edwin M Stanton, who replaced Cameron in January 1862.

Lincoln's 'political genius' enabled him to herd these political cats and keep them driving toward ultimate victory. From the rivalry between these men, and as we all know, Abraham Lincoln became one of the greatest presidents in American history.

Fast forward to 2008, Barack Obama has adopted the 'political genius' of Abraham Lincoln. Obama appointed Hillary Clinton, who was Obama's rival in the presidential nomination in the Democratic Party as the Secretary of State.

The current president proved his decision right as both of them have forged a great working relationship to administer the country.

Here in Malaysia, the EGM for Penang Gerakan which was called on Oct 10 has just passed. The 'vote of no confidence against the state chairman' motion was rejected by the delegates by a margin of 29 votes.

The situation in Penang Gerakan is definitely different and better compared to what has happened in Lincoln's era. In the 1860s, cabinet members disliked each other whereas in Penang Gerakan, there's no public feud between any individuals.

In Penang Gerakan, it is just a group of grassroots members showing their concern for the party's future and advocating reforms in the party.

During the EGM, the voting process went smoothly without any disruption. It shows the maturity and democracy that Gerakan members have practiced. However, post-EGM, several members who had voted for no confidence motion had resigned or are expected to resign from the party due to dissatisfaction with the EGM results. Some are even planning to dissolve their branches.

Among the 145 delegates or other normal members who supported the no confidence motion came from different professions and experts in different fields.

It may be someone who's good at law, giving public speeches, planning strategies, analysing, technology experts or someone who's good at managing logistics. These expertises in different professions are crucial for the party to fight in the next general election and the leadership should not neglect and let them leave the party.

Now that the EGM is over and the decisions have been made by the delegates, members from both sides are left with no choice but to close ranks and focus on the development of the party if they want to achieve better results in the next general election.

Will Gerakan dismiss the rivalry that has emerged due to the EGM? Will the leadership reconcile the conflicting factions in the party? Will Gerakan form its 'Team of Rivals' to win in the next general election?

As President Lincoln has uttered in 1858, "A house divided against itself cannot stand."

Read:

Gerakan sec-gen: It's not winners take all verdict


Why I won't return to Malaysia...yet

Posted: 13 Oct 2010 03:57 PM PDT

From Wee (Melbourne), via e-mail

I think I'm with most Malaysians currently overseas who are yet to go come home. I'm not one of those born with a rich silver spoon in my mouth. My dad and mom slogged and saved to be able to afford me an education overseas, even sacrificing a big chunk of their retirement savings.

After doing my twinning, a couple of years in Malaysia and for a final year or so in Australia in 2006, I had to find my own source of living in Melbourne.

I slogged hard working in food outlet Nando's and sweeping factories, just to get me through university. Now I'm working for a bank.

The sacrifices my parents made to give me a better head start aren't something which I take for granted.

However as my parents begin to age, there is a high possibility that I would need to take it upon myself to take care of them in their old age. There has to come a point in time to logically look at the possibilities and seek out for yourself a better future.

People talk about patriotism. Am I a traitor? Do I not love Malaysia? Yes I love Malaysia, it has done much for me, I love the place, the culture, the people.

When my Aussie friends ask me about the country of my birth, I always talk about how lovely a place it is, the smell and the sights. Many of my friends visit Malaysia solely because I told them about how wonderful it is despite its issues. However like all places, it has its problems, some more than others.

It is genuinely a nice place to visit and have a holiday. Who doesn't love our beautiful beaches? Warm tropical weather and amazing food but to stay and live in Malaysia is a different question.

The disparity between the rich and poor is growing. How is the average Joe able to advance further if life is getting more difficult. The only way is to get a headstart in life, and isn't working overseas earning international experience, becoming a more beneficial person to society a better thing?

The problem is that the government and public society shouldn't vilify people who stay overseas.

Rather, they should be welcoming the rich wealth of experience and also the wealth that they carry.

Encourage people to start businesses in Malaysia. Bring in foreign currencies. That what I intend to do.

I believe some of the other issues the country has that deter Malaysians returning would be political instability and racial inequality. Having a two party political system in my opinion is a big step forward. However the shift should be towards competency and transparency.

However the biggest problem is that Malaysia has lost its goal. The last thing I remember is Vision2020 set forth by Dr Mahathir.

Ever since then, this 1Malaysia, I have no idea where it's going or how it's getting there.

Goals must be clear and simple. With the world economic crisis that hit us two years ago, markets are collapsing all around us, however I have not seen how Malaysia is trying to innovate and push forward with the emerging markets to be global leaders in certain industries, stamping our certain progress for the coming future.

Yes unfortunately, I bring more questions than answers.Hence I'm honestly not the person to lead the country. But I sure will back the person who does.


Taiping Zoo prosecution: Stalling for time?

Posted: 13 Oct 2010 03:56 PM PDT

From Sean Whyte, via e-mail

While Perhilitan is to be commended for the very little time wasted in prosecuting Anson Wong, this does leave one to wonder why after 15 months, the Taiping Zoo has never been prosecuted for possession of a legally protected species.

In June 2009 Perhilitan confiscated two orangutans from Taiping Zoo and a further one from an individual in Kuala Kubu Baru, Selangor. Inexplicably, neither has been prosecuted, leaving Perhilitan wide open, yet again, to further accusations of complicity and corruption. NGO's have requested MACC to investigate.

It is not the first time Taiping Zoo has been implicated in the illegal wildlife trade. In 2002 it was found to have in its possession, four legally protected wild-caught gorillas from Africa. The zoo was never prosecuted and Perhilitan staff were heavily criticized for their complicity in this illegal trade. Another serious matter for MACC to investigate.

As can be seen in the case of Anson Wong, when under pressure Perhilitan can move fast and decisively. So why has it taken this allegedly corrupt department fifteen months to (not) prosecute the Taiping Zoo and the other individual caught red-handed with illegally obtained orangutans?

Until it does prosecute, Perhilitan will remain under a heavy cloud of suspicion.

People now look to minister Douglas Embas to flex his muscles and order Perhilitan to proceed with the prosecution without further delay.

The writer is the chief executive of Nature Alert


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