Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Seeing REDD in climate tool

Seeing REDD in climate tool


Seeing REDD in climate tool

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 08:00 PM PDT

By Hilary Chiew

COMMENT In the last three weeks, Sarawak was abuzz with news of a particular climate change mitigation mechanism called REDD (Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries). First, a news article by Reuters informed that an Australian carbon trading company has signed a carbon offset deal with nine tribal leaders that would purportedly preserved more than 100,000ha of forests in the state.

It would be a 50-50 deal, according to the developer of the carbon offset scheme, Shift2Neutral. About 10,000 people from the 24 villages stand to be paid for keeping their forests intact for the next 20 years.

The firm said it will work with the tribes and a local NGO to help manage the forest, survey the area and access the carbon stored in the trees and soil.

Last week, the first carbon offset and forest conservation workshop was held in Kuching, the state capital, to familiarise the timber-related parties with carbon offset and REDD.

Key players in the commercial logging sector listened intently to speakers on how they can participate in REDD activities.

Director of Forestry, Sarawak, Len Talif Salleh said the state is interested in the implementation of REDD and discussion has already been held with the Sarawak-chapter of the Wildlife Conservation Society (a US-originated non-governmental organisation) to look into the potential of REDD in the Anap Muput Forest Management Unit.

Also, Sarawak would require capacity building, technical assistance and financial support for a number of enabling activities to participate in future REDD activities.

Ultimate saviour


Regarded as a vital part of the global fight against climate change, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) agreed to negotiate new policy approaches and positive incentives to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD).

REDD, which has since been expanded to include a more comprehensive approach and renamed REDD-plus, is envisioned as a forestry sector solution to carbon emissions from logging and forest- clearing activities that are responsible for nearly one-fifth of global emissions.

It has been touted as the "ultimate saviour" against the industrial logging scourge across the equatorial belt that had enriched a handful of timber tycoons and political elites at the expense of the environment and human rights violation of forest-dwelling communities.

However, environmental activists who had campaigned tirelessly against unsustainable industrial logging over the last quarter century found an added reason to support their cause – in the battle to save the world from the impacts of climate change, the embattled tropical rainforests could be saved.

Furthermore, the threat against the tropical rainforests has a relatively new enemy. In the last decade, degraded tropical forests were intensely targeted for conversion into oil palm plantation, including the carbon-rich peat swamp forests partly due to depleted timber stocks and the growing demand for palm oil, which is the cheapest vegetable oil in the world.

In response to the realisation that their forests are vital tools in combating a warming earth, a group of developing countries known as the Coalition of Rainforest Nations demanded that compensation for the carbon stored in their forests should form part of the agreement of the United Nations climate change deal that was supposed to be achieved last December at its 16th Conference of Parties in Copenhagen

The coalition includes Brazil, Costa Rica, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Papua New Guinea and Peru.

But as we all know, the devil is always, always, in the details.

Initially, REDD was designed as a mere mitigation tool void of land tenure consideration and human rights perspectives.

The indigenous peoples' movement has criticised it for its lack of recognition of their rights over the land and the fear that any "value-adding" (in this case, carbon sequestration role of forests to climate change) to the resource would increase existing land conflicts between communities and drivers of deforestation such as industrial logging and large-scale plantation.

The International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change (IIPFCC) lobbied hard at the UNFCCC meetings to have the rights of indigenous peoples recognised and rewarded for they were and continue to be the communities that had fought to defend and manage their ancestral forests for centuries, which turned out to be a service to all humanity.

Financing REDD

While curbing deforestation has been accepted as one of the key solutions to halt climate change, to reverse the trend would need huge financing to preserve this precious resource. And it has proven to be the most contentious area in the negotiation. Should it be financed by public funds (from developed nations as part of their climate debt payment) or the carbon market?

Some indigenous peoples' groups are against the commodification of carbon in the trees and soil as against their sacred view of the universe.

Parties to the UNFCCC are still divided over the source of funding and the type of activities (for example, reforestation that include monoculture timber plantation) that should be supported by REDD. Concerns over leakage (where one area is spared of the chainsaw only to have the loggers move into another area that is not covered by REDD) and permanence (where the period of REDD-protected forests expires) are also being deliberated at the talks.

One of the main criticisms by certain green groups against REDD is that it would ironically reward polluters (logging companies that had destroyed the forests in the first place and released the carbon into the atmosphere) that would now be compensated for not extracting timber for yet another round or convert the land into plantation.

They find it hard to swallow that instead of adopting the "polluters pay principle", the reverse is happening.

Confusion in the media

As the negotiation continues, REDD and its potential in the carbon credit market has generated considerable excitement among the business and media sectors.

Along with it confusion arises. Many had been confused by the voluntary and mandatory carbon market. Under the UNFCCC, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the Kyoto Protocol was developed to assist Annex I parties (developed countries that are supposed to reduce 5.2% of their collective emission level from the 1990 base year between the first commitment period of 2008-2012) to partially meet their reduction commitment.

In line with the principle of the UNFCCC, CDM promotes sustainable development in developing countries through finance and technology-transfer from rich nations.

Credits generated through CDM projects, such as capturing methane from palm oil mill effluents to power the boilers in a palm oil refinery, are traded in the mandatory market.

The voluntary market is literally a free market where companies developed carbon offset projects with some forms of verification and sell those "verified" credits at the marketplace to, say, someone who wants to compensate for his carbon footprints in his personal capacity.

However, media reports have often blurred the line between the two markets and worst, any forest-related mitigation project such as the one reported by Reuters mentioned earlier are associated with the UNFCCC's REDD-plus mechanism that is NOT operationalised yet.

'REDD' herring

Critics of CDM say developed countries are enjoying the cheap options of offsetting their emissions while delaying the relatively more costly transition to low-carbon technologies that they have to take to curb emissions at home.

Many feel the aim of reducing emission has been perverted by the market mechanism approach that is more concerned about cost-effectiveness than promoting clean development technology.

On the local front, the interests in REDD from the timber/plantation sector in Sarawak will definitely invite criticisms. It is well known that logging practices in Sarawak are unsustainable and poorly regulated owing to the political patronage system that the entire industry has operated under since the beginning of commercial logging.

Environmental concerns aside, Sarawak's treatment of its indigenous communities is possibly one of the most appalling in the world. Land conflicts stretching from Lundu in the west to Lawas in the east of the state now account for more than 150 cases that had been filed in the High Court of Sarawak.

Despite several landmark decisions that upheld the native customary rights (NCR) of Sarawak natives, the state remains indifferent.

As the chant of the IIPFCC's activists in the various UNFCCC meetings – "No rights, no REDD" – rings in my mind's ear, it would be near impossible for Sarawak to participate in any form of REDD scheme unless and until it commits to a total reform of its forestry and land rights practices.

And as it has always been, the much criticised and recalcitrant Sarawak logging industry is also proving to be a hindrance for Malaysia to benefit fully from the mechanism. The number (close to 50 and counting) of provisional leases called the Licence for Planted Forests that the state government had issued would mean that no forested areas in Sarawak would be spared the chainsaw, making Malaysia highly susceptible to the problem of leakage.

The state has often mischievously misled the public by regarding its plantation forests scheme as reforestation programme.

If Sarawak truly wants to help the global fight in climate change, it should cancelled all these licences, recognise NCR and implement genuine reforestation in highly degraded forests that would enhance its forest carbon stock. Only in that way, it will be able to redeem itself through REDD-plus.

Hilary Chiew is a socio-environmental researcher and freelance writer based in Kuala Lumpur.


No place for Ibans and Bidayuhs in Sarawak

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 08:00 PM PDT

By Maclean Patrick

COMMENT The American Indians are considered a nation within a nation. Ask and they will refer to themselves as being part of the American Indian Nation. They have customary rights over tracts of land and can govern and set up businesses to finance their own reservations. Interestingly, the American Indian Nation is composed of a collection of distinct tribes, states and ethnic groups, many of whom are intact political communities. Various bills and laws are in effect to protect the indigenous peoples of North America living within the confines of the 50 states that make up the United States of America. Though they are proud of their ethnic heritage, collectively they are known as American Indians.

This is America. Often times demonised by Malaysia, yet it is still civilised enough to safeguard the rights of the people living within its boundaries.

This is Sarawak, where Ibans and Bidayuhs are not recognised as citizens, let alone as natives of Sarawak.

Don't believe me? The following is taken from the Federal Constitution:

Article 161a of the Federal Constitution

In this Article "native" means:

• (a) in relation to Sarawak, a person who is a citizen and either belongs to one of the races specified in Clause (7) as indigenous to the State or is a mixed blood deriving exclusively from those races;

• (b) in relation to Sabah, a person who is a citizen, is the child or grandchild of a person of a race indigenous to Sabah, and was born (whether on or after Malaysia Day or not) either in Sabah or to a father domiciled in Sabah at the time of the birth.

Clause (7)

(7) The races to be treated for the purposes of the definition of "native" in clause (6) as indigenous to Sarawak are the Bukitans, Bisayahs, Dusuns, Sea Dayaks, Land Dayaks, Kadayans, Kelabit, Kayans, Kenyahs (including Sekapans, Kejamans, Lahanans, Punans, Tanjongs dan Kanowits), Lugats, Lisums, Malays, Melanaus, Muruts, Penans, Sians, Tagals, Tabuns and Ukits.

There is no mention of Ibans or Bidayuh(s). In fact, Iban(s) are classified as Sea Dayaks and the Bidayuh(s) are classified as Land Dayaks. Keep this distinction in mind.

Fast forward to the present day.

An amendment was made to the Sarawak Interpretation Ordinance 2004, which in effect declassified the word "Dayak". Thus, the terms Sea Dayaks and Land Dayaks do not have nor hold any meaning whatsoever. And in a stroke of pure idiocy by the august house (the State Legislative Assembly) of Sarawak, two native groups were wiped off the face of the earth -- at least in the reading of the Federal Constitution. Two ethnic groups are now rendered non-existent.

With that, the Sea Dayaks and Land Dayaks lose all rights within Sarawak. In one stroke, the Sea Dayaks and Land Dayaks are a nameless entity; we are worse off than the American Indians. It would have been better for the Sea Dayaks and the Land Dayaks to go the way of the Dodo -- extinction merits a mention in the history books. But the Sea Dayaks and Land Dayaks are very much alive and form the majority ethnic groups in Sarawak.

How then can a majority group like the Ibans and Bidayuhs be rendered helplessly non-existent in their native land?

Entity without a nation

I am an Iban, my parents are both Ibans and I can trace my ancestry to the early Iban migration up the Kepuas river into Sarawak; and this reading of the rules of the land of Malaysia has rendered me an entity without a nation. And this disaster does not just befell me but the generations after me.

Where then do I stand as a legal citizen of Malaysia? What claims to citizenship can I make since I am effectively unknown in the eyes of the Federal Consitution? It is impossible to imagine a citizen who is not recognised as a citizen of the land upon which he/she was born. So what am I? What manner of logic did the Dayak leaders, voted into office by the Dayak people, use to rationalise and support the declassification of the term Dayak?

If we were to go along with the logic of allowing the right for one to claim his own ethnic identity, thus in declassifying the Dayak term, the Federal Constitution should have also been amended in order to reflect the use of the more specific Iban and Bidayuh term. But no amendment was made to the Federal Constitution to insert the specific term Iban and Bidayuh to replace the now defunct Sea Dayak and Land Dayak terms.

The implications of the amendment to the Sarawak Interpretation Ordinance 2004 are clearly visible and telling if it is read along with the interpretation used by the Student Intake Management Division, Higher Learning Department and Higher Education Ministry to classify what constitute a Bumiputera. This definition is used to vet the suitability of Sarawakian students for entry into institutions of higher learning. It was promptly used in the incident where 17-year-old Marina Undau was deemed not eligible for entry into a matriculation programme because she was not a Bumiputera.

Their definition is as follows:

• If either parent of a candidate is a Malay who is a Muslim/Orang Asli as defined in Article 160 (2) of the Federal Constitution, the child is considered a Bumiputera.

• Sabah – If the father of the candidate is a Malay who is a Muslim/native of Sabah as defined by Article 161A(6)(a) of the Federal Constitution, the child is considered a Bumiputera.

• Sarawak – If the father and mother are natives of Sarawak as defined under Article 161A(6)(b) of the Federal Constitution, the child is considered a Bumiputera.

Take this definition and read it against the Federal Constitution and the amended Sarawak Interpretation Ordinance 2004 and Ibans and Bidayuhs are classified non-Bumiputera.

Why?

In order to be a Bumiputera, you must first be a native of Sarawak. But according to the amended Sarawak Interpretation Ordinance 2004, Ibans and Bidayuhs are not natives of Sarawak.

This is a clear case of a government that has failed to look into the welfare of the people living within its borders. Instead, it is a government that has robbed a living group of peoples their identity, their rights, and ultimately their dignity. I hope the elected leaders of Sarawak are proud of what they have done; because I am sure not.

Maclean Patrick, a webmaster in Kuching, is a contributor to FreeMalaysiaToday.



Bekas MP BN diarah bayar ganti rugi kepada Husam

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 12:46 PM PDT

NOTA EDITOR: Nampaknya usaha memfitnah Husam Musa semakin gagal. Kepada ahli-ahli PAS yang termakan fitnah-fitnah yang dilemparkan oleh puak-puak pro Perpaduang dahulu, saya minta kaji balik perkara yang kamu dengar itu. Kemungkinan besar segala yang kamu dengar itu salah dan fitnah semata-mata.

Saya rasa, fitnah kepada Husam di kalangan ahli PAS agak sukar untuk dihapuskan memandangkan Editor akhbar Siasah (milik PAS) sendiri adalah agen memfitnah Husam. Namun, beliau masih dikekalkan sebagai editor Siasah dan gaji beliau tetap dibayar oleh PAS.

Maka, memfitnah Husam Musa telah menjadi budaya dalam PAS apabila tokoh memfitnah Husam seperti Suyuti dibela dan diberikan gaji oleh PAS.

Saya sokong Husam menyaman akhbar Siasah. Apabila pimpinan2 PAS sendiri tidak mampu mengambil tindakan terhadap pekerja mereka sendiri yang memfitnah pimpinan, maka eloklah Husam Musa mengambil jalan di luar jemaah

Bekas MP BN diarah bayar ganti rugi kepada Husam
Wartawan Kita


KOTA BHARU, 24 Ogos: Bekas anggota parlimen (MP) Tanah Merah, Datuk Ir Shaari Hassan hari ini diarah mahkamah membayar ganti rugi kepada anggota Exco kerajaan negeri, Datuk Husam Musa ekoran kes saman fitnah.

Penyelesaian kes saman fitnah tersebut dicapai di luar mahkamah dan telah direkod Hakim Mahkamah Tinggi Kota Bharu, Ahmad Zaidi Ibrahim.

Kes saman tersebut difail Husam pada 23 Febuari 2008 ekoran Shaari mengeluarkan kenyataan yang dianggap memfitnahnya pada satu ceramah.

Pada ceramah yang diadakan di Masjid Padang Lalang, Tanah Merah pada 25 Disember 2007 Shaari menyebut Husam seorang yang hanya bertopengkan PAS.

Selain itu disebut juga anggota Exco terbabit adalah manusia yang terkaya di Kelantan kerana mempunyai wang sebanyak RM30 juta yang mana wang tersebut diberi oleh tauke-tauke balak.

Berikutan fitnah tersebut Husam telah memohon defendan memohon maaf dan menuntut sejumlah ganti rugi dibayar terhadapnya.

Husam ketika bercakap kepada pemberita bagaimana pun enggan menjelaskan jumlah ganti rugi yang perlu dibayar bekas anggota parlimen dari Barisan Nasional (BN) terbabit.

"Cukup sekadar saya katakan jumlah gantinya puas hati bagi pihak saya. Saya berharap kes ini menjadi sebagai satu pengajaran.

"Kita perlu juga menjaga air muka orang lain jangan mengaibkan seseorang di hadapan orang ramai," katanya di pejabatnya di Kota Darulnaim.

Pada kes tersebut Husam diwakili peguam Hisyam Fauzi, manakala Shaari Azmi Abdullah.

Husam juga memberitahu terdapat lapan lagi kes saman yang dikemukanya terhadap beberapa pihak termasuk dua kes terhadap Utusan Malaysia dan dua (The New Strait Times).

Menurutnya saman terhadap Utusan Malaysia dibuat ekoran penerbitan berita mendakwa beliau meletak jawatan seperti disiar akhbar terbabit pada 21 November 2009.


Why Afghanistan will continue to take the lives of Western soldiers - a compelling video

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 10:45 AM PDT


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Whispering Pines...

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 10:42 AM PDT

by Johnny Horton, another great cowboy singer who, like Hank Williams Jnr, also died pretty yound.

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Johnny Horton Whispering Pines Lyrics:
The snowflakes fall as Winter calls
And time just seems to fly
As if the loneliness in me that makes me want to cry
My heart is sad like a Mourning Dove
that's lost his mate in flight
Hear the cooing of his lonely heart
through the stillness of the night

[Chorus:]
Whispering pines, whispering pines, tell me is it so
[ Find more Lyrics on http://mp3lyrics.org/1NIX ]
Whispering pines, whispering pines,
you're the one who knows
My darlin's gone, ohh she's gone
And I need your sympathy
Whispering pines send my baby back to me

See that squirrel up in the tree, his
mate there on the ground
Hear their barking call of love, for
the happiness they've found
Is my love still my love, oh this I gotta know
Send a message by the wind, because I love her so

From clarityofnight.blogspot.com
REPRISE/Reprisal?

Monday, January 11, 2010
Entry #139
Whispering Pine for a Silhouette
by Chong Yen Long

My body feels warm tonight although there is a breeze entering the room. I descend the lonely mansion onto the Port Dickson beach to seek solace of twilight and twinkle, winking stars.

Thirty years is a long time by human reckoning, but it seems like only yesterday. My body from waist up trembles--at the thought of caressing a sixteen-year-old body sublime, me some seven years senior but not any wiser, in a fruity encounter I think subconsciously fostered by reading DH Lawrence's "Lady Chatterley's Lover" at the tender age of 13!

I look up to the study in the bungalow my rich aunt bequeathed me instead of to her children because she found me more adorable as I could paint and write adult poetry in childhood. I am also romantic; otherwise, who would imagine bringing a young neighbourhood gal to a rendezvous in this gods' forbidden territory?

A black bird suddenly takes off from a whispering pine tree as I approach a bench underneath its arching fronds. And as I look up that window, I can see the silhouette--maybe this crow's granduncle had once stood at that window-sill peeping at two other "birds" locked in embrace?

I could still sign my lover's name in a thousand variations -- Chinese calligraphy style--in the sands.

Tonight I celebrate the return of my first-love silhouette in a hallowed study. I can feel the electrifying sensation of a climax being scaled as we entwine in a Kamasutra pose.

Posted by jason evans at 6:09 PM
23 comments:

Ayodele Morocco-Clarke said...

Nicely erotic!
January 11, 2010 6:12 PM
Bernita said...

Sweet silhouettes of summer love.
January 11, 2010 8:55 PM
Aniket said...

"I could still sign my lover's name in a thousand variations"

Well not 1000 but I did that too...Loved the little descriptions sprinkled over the piece.
January 12, 2010 1:44 AM
Craig said...

Strong descriptive piece.
January 12, 2010 4:02 AM
catvibe said...

Lovely romantic writing.
January 12, 2010 7:48 AM
Deb S said...

Ditto the strong description comment. Love the "whispering pine"
January 12, 2010 10:28 AM
desiderata said...

ayodele:
sometimes I renick desiderata as desiFOOLofEROTICA:)

bernita:
i remember watching "Summer of 42"; mine came in 1972:)

aniket:
I wish i were your age agin -- i will even go 10,000X:(

Craig:

descriptive only when inspired -- when penning this Desi must thank host Jason's photo-prompt, it brought back memories:) or :(

catvibe: romantic I'm, and many of my newer blogreaders think Desi's fe-mail!:)

deb s: whispering pine(s) was inspired by cowboy song sung by johnny horton
Thanks awe for feedback! I raise a tehtarik to Thee! -- Desi
January 12, 2010 11:10 AM
laughingwolf said...

well wrought, chong...
January 12, 2010 11:15 AM
Four Dinners said...

Summer of '42? Classic stuff. Well written old bean. Very well written.
January 12, 2010 11:22 AM
Laurel said...

Romantic, erotic, evocative, and sensual. The early loss of innocence isn't so jarring in one with a soul so old, but I was a bit disturbed by references to young experience. Was this intended or am I just being a prude?

Really well written.
January 12, 2010 11:36 AM
lena said...

awww.. so damn romantic and beautiful. Very very well written.
January 12, 2010 2:25 PM
pjd said...

It is romantic, for sure. But I am having trouble understanding the various ages... 30 years is a long time? 16 years old, seven years her senior? Tender age of 13? Is the MC 53 years old, recalling his first time?
January 12, 2010 6:08 PM
desiderata said...

laffin'wolf: woof, woof, choruses D crow:)

4dinners: N "hint" to pjd later:)

My summer came 30years after '42; maketh Desi quite classically JurassicK:)

Laurel:

Thanks for thy compliment. As for thy being a byte "disturbed", no worries there/dare, for I was precocious alright, but never "irresponsible". Lady Chatterley's Lover was a banned book in my country then when I stolen a peep at a copy borrowed from a bosom friend (knotty like Desi!:) studying an a Catholic school (Malaysia now wracked by controversy over use of term "Allah" by non-Muslims that saw several church attacks (firebombed) in recent days; sorry I digress...)So thou art no prude, it's just Desi being too adventurous for his own good, but rest assured, 2X, I didn't stray that "mush"!:)

Lena: "Sieh sieh" which is Thank you in Chinese; happy you enjoyed the fictional schoolboy romance:)

pjd:

Ah, pls read my response to Laurel first.
Now if you care to traverse to my blog, my profile says I'm a fan of Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot.

Your detection power is quite close to the towering sleuths I mentioned, but I did throw a few red herrings in the Numbers!:)

"ENJOY!"

PS: Thanks to all commenters once again. BTW, I had published an anthology of poems "Midnight Voices" -- 900 copies of 1,000 print-run sold and almost 100 copies gifted away. A solitary copy lies in my study... you may peep to an intro about my maiden work in the July 7, 2007 blogpost:)
January 12, 2010 8:40 PM
Kartik said...

Very nice! In throes of passison and very sensual!
January 15, 2010 6:19 AM
JaneyV said...

Though very sensual and romantically charged I have to say that I found the taking of a 16 year old girl by a man in his 20s to be deeply icky. I realise that he loved her and that it was a deeply meaningful experience but - I still think that a 16 year old is a child. Or am I just being an old fuddy-duddy?
January 16, 2010 7:01 AM
James R. Tomlinson said...

Well, I am an old fuddy-duddy. Sixteen will get you twenty. Still, very intriguing piece (of writing that is). I'm not too sure the DH Lawrence line works--seems a bit forced or contrived.
January 16, 2010 11:55 PM
desiderata said...

janey V: take the opeice as a "flight of passage of youthful exuberance" -- let not moral taint crop in otherwise there won't be honest sharing. Thanks for your honest reaction -- old fuddy-duddy is still young-at-heART!:)
January 17, 2010 3:56 AM
desiderata said...

james rt:

Just add to above response to janeyV and all: that this is a fictional creation, and much poetic licence is used. -- Desi
January 17, 2010 3:58 AM
Aimee Laine said...

My mind screamed "pedophile" at the "tender age of 13!" but, having been one of those 14 year olds in love with an older man (albeit he was only 4 years older) there is a maturity we sometimes forget about. :) I love the romantic feel you give as if he too is nervous and waiting and longing sweetly. :)
January 17, 2010 3:41 PM
Aerin said...



my caveat

Something I Would Keep

This piece feels refined and erudite, like a spot-on cup of high quality tea. To then have it be romantic, sensual, erotic is a lovely blend.

Something I Might Tweak

I got the sense of two female lovers, which is not bad, but perhaps doesn't suit the purpose that you'd intended
January 17, 2010 9:18 PM
desiderata said...

aimee:

don't scream, jest whisper; but i'm grateful by your understanding about maturity...

aerin:
keep: thanks for appreciation
tweak: Jest a s-mile:)

PS: And also thanks (on unsolicited other fellow writers behalf2:) for your regular formatted "comments" at all entries -- good teaching process!
January 18, 2010 3:41 AM
Chris Eldin said...

Ah, a bit of controversy stirring about.
:-)
I was and still am confused by the ages, but this was sweetly erotic nonetheless.
January 18, 2010 12:12 PM
desiderata said...

Chris E:

Some controversy is good, means we are truly democratic on the Internet:), liberating medium for us writers from Malaysia where Govt controls major print media:(
January 18, 2010 9:53 PM

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Penyakit dan maut usah ditempah-Dia akan datang sendiri.

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 12:14 PM PDT

Penyakit barah yang dialami oleh UMNO dan BN merupakan penyakit yang sepatutnya boleh dielakkan jika pemimpin dan ahlinya selama ini mengambil berat tentang partinya.

Terbitnya penyakit yang dialami oleh UMNO adalah 'self inflicting'. Tidak mungkin kesalahannya kerana permainan pembangkang. Pembangkang hanya mengambil kesempatan diatas kelemahan UMNO sendiri. Musuh UMNO ialah sikap pemimpin dan ahli-ahlinya sendiri bukan pihak lain.

Begitu jugalah BN; musuhnya adalah dari kalangan komponen BN itu sendiri. Itulah sebabnya Najib yang tidak pernah merasa susah dalam karier politknya sebelum ini tidak berkemampuan untuk membendung keadaan ini dari merebak dan berlarutan.

Barah merupakan penyakit yang disebabkan oleh perperangan diantara sel-sel tubuh kita yang akhirnya menjadi penyebab barah itu berkembang dan membiak kerana banyak sel-sel kita yang mati. Jika tidak dikawal sel-sel yang mati dengan begitu mengembang akan menjadikan empunya tubuh itu menjadi lemah dan akhirnya meninggal dunia.

Sebab sel-sel mati kalau ditanyakan kepada pakar perubatan ialah kerana cara hidup yang tidak betul termasuklah cara dan amalan permakanan yang tidak seimbang. Lain-lain sebabnya ialah kerana 'habits' yang buruk seperti merokok atau hidup dalam persekitaran yang tidak sesuai, seperti bekerja dalam kilang yang menggunakan bahan gas kimia dan sebagainya.

Saya pun tak pandai nak membuat ulasan dalam bidang ini kerana saya bukan lah seorang yang bijak lebih-lebih lagi dalam bidang perubatan dan kesihatan. Mungkin Dr Mahathir sebagai seorang 'medical practitioner' yang berpegalaman boleh memberikan penerangan lengkap tentang penyakit ini.

Jika Dr Mahathir tidak ada masa mungkin Dr Chua Soi Lek boleh menerangkan isu penyakit ini walaupun kebelakangan ini beliau lebih terkenal dengan kegiatannya dalam bidang lain selain dari 'profession' beliau sebagai seorang doktor dan ahli politik. Mungkin oleh kerana kemahiran beliau didalam bidang tambahan inilah beliau dianggap sebagai seorang 'good performer' lantas beliau dipilih mengetuai parti kedua terbesar dalam BN itu.

BN itu merupakan tubuh yang besar dan merangkumi jutaan sel-sel didalamnya. Diantara sel-sel yang mati ialah pemimpin-pemimpin dalam UMNO dan MCA serta pemimpin komponen yang lain seperti Gerakkan dan yang lain-lain. Tuduh menuduh diantara pimpinan yang ada didalam komponen sama seperti pertembungan sel-sel yang ada didalam tubuh BN itu sendiri.

Penyakit kanser itu lebih parah selepas pilihanraya umum yang lalu dan kanser yang ada didalam tubuh BN itu sudah sampai keperingkat 'terminal'. Ramai diantara yang dihinggapi penyakit kanser itu akan mengalami kehilangan berat badan. Semakin hari semakin kurus, macam tali gasing; pangkalnya besar hujungnya tirus.

Seperti orang yang menghadapi kanser yang peringkat 'terminal', UMNO tidak akan menambat keyakinan rakyat dengan sepenuhnya. Kanser ini selalunya susah hendak dipulihkan dengan sepenuhnya. Kalau penyakit itu sembuh, sembuhnya itu tidak kekal. Lazimnya ia akan kembali, dan akan kembali selepas ianya pulih kali yang kedua, ketiga dan seterusnya.

Dimana-mana kita mendengar orang ramai bercakap tentang penyakit yang dihadapi UMNO kita ini. Kalaulah ahli-ahli sendiri tidak mempunyai keyakinan, masakan parti ini akan kekal lama?

Sudah menjadi tabii manusia yang mereka akan memberikan keyakinan pada pihak atau tubuh yang sihat dari memberikannya kepada tubuh yang berpenyakit apa lagi penyakit yang 'terminal' seperti yang dihadapi oleh UMNO sekarang ini.

Hanya satu cara sahaja untuk UMNO dipulihkan; iaitu semua tubuh yang dihinggapi penyakit ini wajar diganti leseluruhannya. Ketuanya lain, yang kanan-kanan pun orang lain dan yang menganggotai MKT pun yang lain dan semuanya lain bagi menunjukkan yang parti itu serius untuk berubah.

Kalau UMNO ada 'political will' sekuat ini, maka harapan untuk terus menjadi kuasa yang mentadbir negara ada sedikit harapan. Tapi saya tidak yakin UMNO ada kudrat untuk melakukan perubahan ini.

Kalau pesakit tidak mahu menghadapi maut dengan cepat, pesakit itu perlu banyak berpantang terutamanya dalam pemakanan. Makan terlalu banyak tak boleh, dan makan hak orang lain yang tidak dihalalkan pun tidak boleh kerana maut hampir tiba.

Apabila seseorang itu sudah jatuh sakit selalunya rakan-rakan yang selalu bersama tidak bersama kita lagi. Mungkin mereka boleh menziarah kita sekali sekala. Yang selalu menziarah hanyalah sanak saudara dan ipar lamai sahaja. Kalau sudah sakit duit yang kita kumpul selama ini pun hanya boleh digunakan untuk membeli ubat dan vitamin sahaja.

Apabila mati siapakah dikalangan warith kita yang akan melangsaikan hutang kepada rakyat dan negara semua jumlah yang diambil secara tidak betul itu? Kesian kepada yang masih hidup yang terpaksa menanggung hutang-hutang itu.

Apalah faedahnya hidup didunia in jika hidup kita untuk menyusahkan generasi yang akan datang?


Teresa Kok: Steven's Corner owner lying

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 05:27 AM PDT

Seputeh MP Teresa Kok, today rubbish the claim by Steven's Corner owner, S Sathisilan that he did not threaten or assault Lim Tai San nor does he owe him any money. "Police wouldn't charge anyone without sufficient evidence," said Kok when met at Lim's shop. She also rebuked S Sathisilan's claim that he did not seek her help to settle the issue with Lim. "He did not come personally to me pleading to settle the issue but his brother N Sathisilan was the one who met my assistant with regards to this assault," said Kok.
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20100824_Bangsar_temple.avi.s.mp4

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 05:17 AM PDT

Story to follow.
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Time: 02:40 More in News & Politics


Overcompensating publicly for personal trials & tribulations

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 04:03 PM PDT

Years ago my workplace buddy, born of mixed ethnic parentage (Dad a Malay and Mum a Chinese), was always under personal 'trial & tribulations' and indeed stress to prove he was more Malay than a Malay without his type of parentage.

He was one of the nicest blokes I have had the pleasure to know – in fact he was one of my three top mateys. So I felt quite free to tell him that his internalized 'trial &tribulations' appeared rather racist to someone who didn't know him. He confessed he was suffering from a fear of not being accepted by the Malays because of his Mum.

I wonder whether that's the same bugbear a certain DNA-Denier is suffering from, and who reckons he has to chase the Chinese out of Malaysia to enhance his acceptance in his adopted community wakakaka.

There are various forms of such bugbears. One variant that I suspect had happened recently to my hero Karpal Singh was his atypical (note: not typical) outburst in calling for the death sentence for the school bus driver who went mad and attempted to rape a lil' sweetie on his bus, right in front of all the other kids.

Karpal is one who has been against capital punishment so his unusual demand of such a draconian penalty against a 'mentally sick' person was startling. But I am glad to say he has recovered from that aberration as he had recently cautioned Pak Haji Nik Aziz against introducing the penalty of stoning women to death for abandoning their babies.

As a wannabe-Freud I suspect Karpal could be embarrassed by the rapist being an Indian and wanted to lash out at the culprit of the heinous crime for bringing disrepute to an Indian community already under social siege for ownership of a majority of crimes.

Now I see perhaps this same internalized 'trial & tribulation' in Loh Seng Kok of the MCA.

Malaysiakini reported in its 'Strip the surau vandals of citizenship' that Loh stated: Those found guilty of vandalising the surau in Negri Sembilan should have their citizenship revoked ... The attack violates the basic tenets of the Rukunegara and the culprits, if ever apprehended, should be stripped of their citizenship."

Maybe Loh thinks those teenagers caught vandalising a surau are Chinese, and he is overcompensating?

On the other hand, I could be wrong where Loh has been merely rubbing it in for UMNO because those kids are Malays?

Prior to 05 March 2008, Loh was the federal MP for Kelana Jaya and had annoyed the Malay pollies (both UMNO and PAS) for speaking out the truth in Parliament in 2006 against our BTN-rised 'imbalanced' history textbooks, new prayer recital guidelines and the problems faced by non-Muslims with regards to places of worship.

My 2006 posts on him are as follows:
(1) MCA MP warned by UMNO and PAS!
(2) 50 UMNO Youths Threatened MCA MP!
(3) For & Against MCA MP Loh Seng Kok.

Following the incident, MCA did not select him to stand in Kelana Jaya on 05 March 2008, which turned out to be a blessing in disguise because he avoided the humiliation of being trashed by PKR's last minute candidate, his clan man Loh Gwo Burne wakakaka.

Loh Seng Kok has just gone overboard in calling for the citizenships of the young surau vandals to be stripped off, in the way that YouTube rapper Namawee was threatened.

As a MCA leader, he should realize that stripping someone of his or her citizenship is restricted to very serious crimes against the nation, like serving in a foreign army and waging war against one's own country (which incidentally is different from an insurgent who fight against a political establishment but not the country).

But my dear Loh, stripping citizenship off someone most certainly doesn't apply to perpetrators of petty crimes like vandalizing or rapping out a political song, or for that matter, even serious crimes such as murder.

Let's have a more civilized political debate and balanced policy proposals instead of the usual grandstanding, overly dramatic and draconian calls of stoning people to death or stripping them off their citizenship or stinging them with trained tebuans (hornets).


Soi Lek urges examination of sermon’s text during investigations

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 08:35 AM PDT

--->Hello there: Dr Chua greeting some of the JKKK and JKKP chairmen and secretaries attending a seminar at Park Avenue Hotel in Sungai Petani, Kedah yesterday


SUNGAI PETANI: Investigations into the alleged use of Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng's name during Friday prayers should also include checking the particular contentious text, said MCA president Datuk Seri Dr Chua Soi Lek.

"The main question here is whether the text was approved and what was the motive for the name of a non-Muslim to appear in the Friday prayers conducted in the said mosques.

"Also, when the name was inserted, was it with his (Lim's) consent or whether he (Lim) was aware of it," he said.

Dr Chua said he did not know much about the issue and only got to read about it in a Malay daily.

It was reported that Penang police had also set up a special task force to investigate reports that Lim's name was used instead of the Yang di-Pertuan Agong during Friday prayers in two mosques in the state.

Earlier, when opening a leadership course for new Federal Village Security and Development Com-mittee (JKKP) heads in Penang, Kedah and Perlis, Dr Chua reminded the Chinese new village chiefs not to "bite the hand that feeds them".

He added the leaders should bear in mind that they represented Barisan Nasional and the Federal Government in the new villages.

"Therefore, they should have the sensitivity and awareness about their roles, and how they should discharge their duties as community leaders," he said at the one-day programme yesterday organised by MCA with the co-operation of the Housing and Local Government Ministry.

Dr Chua added the MCA leadership and the ministry hoped the JKKKP leaders would also use the financial allocations with utmost care.

On the allegation by 988 Chinese radio station host Jamaluddin Ibrahim that Dr Chua had used a discriminatory remark on him, the party president said: "When Jamal started talking, I reminded him that this (month) is Ramadan.

"(There was) nothing excessive and I hope Jamal will not refer to religion or whatever he thinks that he can abuse for his own interest."

An online news portal had reported that Jamaluddin was seeking an apology and clarification from Dr Chua, after the latter allegedly told him to be more responsible as a Muslim over the issue.

Jamaluddin was taken off the air and told to go on leave by 988 chief executive officer Wong Lai Ngo after the company received a warning letter from the Malaysian Commu­nications and Multimedia Com­mission (MCMC).

MCMC had deemed as offensive certain contents aired over the radio station.

Star RFM Sdn Bhd chairman Datin Linda Ngiam on Aug 19 said the company was conducting an investigation into the matter.

THE STAR (Tuesday August 24, 2010)


Towards a new awakening true Malaysian Women as a Political Force

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 07:21 AM PDT

By Nurul Izzah AnwarCOMMENT A Malay daily recently declared that a civil war would break out in the country. And this war would dwarf the May 13 1969 racial riot – the worst in Malaysia's history. The war, said the newspaper, is a response to a non-existing amended constitution that abolishes the special position of the Malays and Islam.

Deputy Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin also made reference to the 1969 riot in his comment when he reminded his Barisan Nasional (BN) colleague, Dr Chua Soi Lek, to tone down his demands to scrap what the government likes to call the pro-Malay economic policy.

In Penang, we heard stories that the name of the Yang di-Pertuan Agong has been replaced with Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng in Friday sermons in some mosques in the state.

Apart from some Umno leaders who are fond of making racist comments, we also now have Perkasa which claimed to champion the constitutional position of the Malays.

These stories have been reported at length and front-paged by many newspapers, inviting discussions from both sides of the political divide.

These stories are not new. Many of us have heard similar stories not too long ago.

Remember in 1987 when Umno organised a racially charged political rally? It was followed by detention of many opposition leaders, including Karpal Singh and Guan Eng, under Operasi Lalang.

I wonder what the people behind the recent racial provocations hope to achieve.

Political theatre

I was too young to remember Operasi Lalang, but from my understanding of the event, it sounds so similar to the political theatre we are watching right now.

Every now and then, Malaysians are forced to watch the show based on an outdated script, written perhaps by those in power who benefit from racial polarisation.

Except for the change in the cast, the script always revolves around racial hatred, and how one community is a threat to another community's interest.

Thank God, this latest show has not resulted in a new racial riot, or the "great war" that the Malay daily was trying to instigate.

Obviously, this tactic has not worked with Malaysians. Young Malaysians now demand a new script for the nation to be written by them.

In saying that the latest attempt at disuniting the country has failed, I am not entirely dismissing the fact that the racial rhetoric might have attracted some groups of young Malaysians.

Reading reports on Perkasa activities, I noticed the presence of a small number of young Malays. These are the people that I wish to reach out and to join other young Malaysians to write a new script for the nation.

Real issues

Perkasa has been accused of only trying to defend rent-seeking activities, but I doubt these youths are awarded any government contract. My suspicion is they have been indoctrinated with years of racist propaganda.

They are not alone. I have heard of civil servants and even teachers who made racist remarks while on the job.

For them, this country is all about "us" versus "them", "oppression by certain group" or "risk of losing political power."

But I have not given up on them.

I want to tell them that it is not hard to look beyond the colour of our skin, to understand that diversity has always been the foundation of this country.

I would like for all of us to focus on the real issues that will destroy this country: such as corruption, low foreign investment, lack of job opportunities and many other problems shared by all Malaysians.

It would not be easy to make them understand, but the success of the new script for Malaysia's future depends on not just one group but also others who have been misled and marginalised. That is why all Malaysians must speak out and decide once and for all what the new script would be. A script built on the promise and vision of an independent Malaysia for all citizens: based on the rule of law, justice and equality.

Those who deny the will of the people for a better Malaysia should take note. Malaysians recognise theatre as it is, and the days of political theatre are over.



Nurul Izzah Anwar is PKR's MP for Lembah Pantai.


Nurul Izzah Anwar.


Monday, August 31, 2009

Nurul Izzah AnwarPUTRI REFORMASI MALAYSIA'S FUTURE PRIME MINISTER IN MAKING CAN THEY STOP HER THIS TIME AFTER WHAT DID TO HER FATHER ANWAR IBRAHIM


MP for Lembah Nurul Izzah Anwar

MP for Lembah Nurul Izzah Anwar

by Nurul Izzah Anwar

Malays speaking without fear
Nurul Izzah AnwarPUTRI REFORMASI MALAYSIA'S FUTURE PRIME MINISTER IN MAKING CAN THEY STOP HER THIS TIME AFTER WHAT DID TO HER FATHER ANWAR IBRAHIM
Nurul Izzah Anwar I can't say that I know Datuk Zaid Ibrahim very well. Our past encounters have been limited to a fleeting hello in front of the steps of my alma mater, the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies in 2006, another chat during a reception in honour of Datuk Ambiga Sreevanesagan in June and, most recently, at the PKR's recent EGM. It's amazing, but perhaps unsurprising that he has in these three years evolved from an ambiguous reformist in Umno into the conscience of all Malaysians.
I had always been impressed by his outspokenness, and his willingness to fearlessly voice out his views on issues of national importance is nothing short of inspirational. Zaid does not mince his words where many hesitate to call a spade a spade, especially where it matters the most.
An articulate Malay speaking out for a multiracial and progressive Malaysia is terribly important in this current political climate. For our own community, Zaid epitomises how the Malays might redefine ourselves, to re-imagine a world where we do not think that we are inferior or threatened but are rather confident in whom we are.
In reading Zaid's book Saya Pun Melayu, I sense the need for Malays to embrace a new paradigm on what it means to be Malay. Many indeed are doing so and this is a heartening. "Malay" need no longer carry connotations of dependency on the state, insecurity or the crippling feeling alienation and the lack of self-worth.
The word "Malay" can and must eventually mean a call to embrace a broader Malaysian identity, along with a true, inclusive nationalism that is proud of who we are individually but also in what we have accomplished together. We can be sure of our identities and yet still be a part of something greater than all of us — and this is something all the ethnic groups in Malaysia ought to aspire to.
Zaid's book highlights that fact that we need to look beyond the stereotypes and take an objective, albeit positive look at our community's accomplishments. We have made great strides in business, the arts, education and the professions. Our success extends from Lembah Pantai where Malays own vibrant businesses selling products made by Malays to the flourishing nasi lemak stalls in Kota Baru.
We attend leading universities throughout the world, increasingly through our own merit. We can count internationally recognised choreographers, painters, cartoonists, writers, and film directors amongst our numbers.
Beyond these markers, our success can more often that not be seen at home through our everyday acts of compassion and sensitivity to others, which spread to our fellow Malaysians to become a national virtue. The kindness shown towards our children, parents and neighbours is perhaps one of the most important signs of who we Malays are as a community. These are real achievements that no one can or would want to take from us.
I'm not denying that we still have a long way to go in moving our community forward, nor am I unmindful that a lot of our successes would not have been in possible without the NEP and its institutions. However, it has become patently obvious that these structures are now holding the Malays back, and that the world has changed since then.
The Malays and, as a-matter-of-fact, all Malaysians need to change as well if we want to remain relevant in this world. We need to step away from our obsession with all things racial and realise that the project of nation-building is not a zero-sum game. Malaysia can never succeed until and unless its entire people feel like they are truly a part of it.
Why then does the old paradigm of ethnic insecurity persist? Why does suspicion and acrimony towards our fellow Malaysians and they towards us still linger? Why are mainstream newspapers calling for ethnic conflict, accusing minority communities of all sorts of ludicrous plots?
The sad reality is that these myths are being perpetuated by Umno and Barisan Nasional for their own gain. The fact is that Umno wants to keep the Malay community under its suzerainty forever. They do this by focusing on what we have supposedly not achieved, rather than acknowledging our gains and potential.
They claim to want to protect and uplift the Malay community, but all they have been doing for the last few years is playing on their fears and prejudices. The same can be said for the Barisan components with the non-Malays. This glass-half-empty mentality is being used by Umno/BN to protect each other and to ward off challenges to their stranglehold on power.
We've seen from the case of Zaid of how Umno demonises anyone who steps out of the pattern of complete loyalty to the party and who have different ideas on how to improve the livelihoods of Malays and Malaysians. We have also as of late seen their scare tactics in action. They have labelled people as "traitors" for calling for a new path of development for Malaysia. They prefer to protect their interests rather than allow the Malaysian people — especially the Malays — to benefit from reform, less corruption and more inclusion.
Umno also regrettably perpetuates the myth that the Malay community is perpetually under threat from their non-Malay counterparts, and that Umno is the only party that can save them from this supposed "servitude". This, rather than anything else, is why race relations have gotten worse in Malaysia.
You cannot expect harmony in a country where its largest ethnic group is constantly bombarded with the message that the minorities are supposedly out to get them and take away their rights. Yet, they chose to follow this tactic since they believe in the short term this will strengthen Umno and bring Malays back to the party.
They use these "attacking" tactics because they cannot offer anything else. They have shown that they would prefer to entrench those in power rather than allow new ideas and reforms to increase our chances for greater success. There is a real danger that their short-sightedness may cost future generations of Malaysians dearly.
The fact is that Malays have nothing to fear. We are demographically the largest ethnic group in Malaysia and the birth rate is going to keep it that way. Our position in the constitution is enshrined and this isn't going to change either.
That is what Umno and the Malay extremists do not get, and what the community as a whole needs to understand. The non-Malays and Malays who challenge Umno are not seeking to reduce the position of the Malays in anyway, but to defend and uplift all Malaysians. We have to understand that we are all tied together and that we all have a stake in the land. We cannot survive individually as Malays, Chinese or Indians but as Malaysians.
Our non-Malay fellow citizens are not "challenging" our rights or "insulting" or culture and religion — rather they are calling for our nascent nationhood to be allowed to achieve it's full potential than for us to remain stuck in our ethnic and mental ghettos. The liberals and moderates amongst the non-Malays also suffer from the depredations of extremists within their own communities — they deserve our support as well. The wave of reactionary politics that is engulfing us can only be turned back if progressive Malaysians stand firm against their threats and untruths.
While it is true that much more needs to be done to address those who have not benefited — for all Malaysians — the focus on what we don't have rather on what we have accomplished only undermines us. We need to imagine a better future, for Malays and Malaysians — this will incidentally make it easier for all of us to achieve what we might lack.



A new script for Malaysia The sad reality myths are being perpetuated by Umnofor their own gain.under its suzerainty forever.

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 06:54 AM PDT

By Nurul Izzah AnwarCOMMENT A Malay daily recently declared that a civil war would break out in the country. And this war would dwarf the May 13 1969 racial riot – the worst in Malaysia's history. The war, said the newspaper, is a response to a non-existing amended constitution that abolishes the special position of the Malays and Islam.

Deputy Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin also made reference to the 1969 riot in his comment when he reminded his Barisan Nasional (BN) colleague, Dr Chua Soi Lek, to tone down his demands to scrap what the government likes to call the pro-Malay economic policy.

In Penang, we heard stories that the name of the Yang di-Pertuan Agong has been replaced with Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng in Friday sermons in some mosques in the state.

Apart from some Umno leaders who are fond of making racist comments, we also now have Perkasa which claimed to champion the constitutional position of the Malays.

These stories have been reported at length and front-paged by many newspapers, inviting discussions from both sides of the political divide.

These stories are not new. Many of us have heard similar stories not too long ago.

Remember in 1987 when Umno organised a racially charged political rally? It was followed by detention of many opposition leaders, including Karpal Singh and Guan Eng, under Operasi Lalang.

I wonder what the people behind the recent racial provocations hope to achieve.

Political theatre

I was too young to remember Operasi Lalang, but from my understanding of the event, it sounds so similar to the political theatre we are watching right now.

Every now and then, Malaysians are forced to watch the show based on an outdated script, written perhaps by those in power who benefit from racial polarisation.

Except for the change in the cast, the script always revolves around racial hatred, and how one community is a threat to another community's interest.

Thank God, this latest show has not resulted in a new racial riot, or the "great war" that the Malay daily was trying to instigate.

Obviously, this tactic has not worked with Malaysians. Young Malaysians now demand a new script for the nation to be written by them.

In saying that the latest attempt at disuniting the country has failed, I am not entirely dismissing the fact that the racial rhetoric might have attracted some groups of young Malaysians.

Reading reports on Perkasa activities, I noticed the presence of a small number of young Malays. These are the people that I wish to reach out and to join other young Malaysians to write a new script for the nation.

Real issues

Perkasa has been accused of only trying to defend rent-seeking activities, but I doubt these youths are awarded any government contract. My suspicion is they have been indoctrinated with years of racist propaganda.

They are not alone. I have heard of civil servants and even teachers who made racist remarks while on the job.

For them, this country is all about "us" versus "them", "oppression by certain group" or "risk of losing political power."

But I have not given up on them.

I want to tell them that it is not hard to look beyond the colour of our skin, to understand that diversity has always been the foundation of this country.

I would like for all of us to focus on the real issues that will destroy this country: such as corruption, low foreign investment, lack of job opportunities and many other problems shared by all Malaysians.

It would not be easy to make them understand, but the success of the new script for Malaysia's future depends on not just one group but also others who have been misled and marginalised. That is why all Malaysians must speak out and decide once and for all what the new script would be. A script built on the promise and vision of an independent Malaysia for all citizens: based on the rule of law, justice and equality.

Those who deny the will of the people for a better Malaysia should take note. Malaysians recognise theatre as it is, and the days of political theatre are over.



Nurul Izzah Anwar is PKR's MP for Lembah Pantai.


Nurul Izzah Anwar.


Monday, August 31, 2009

Nurul Izzah AnwarPUTRI REFORMASI MALAYSIA'S FUTURE PRIME MINISTER IN MAKING CAN THEY STOP HER THIS TIME AFTER WHAT DID TO HER FATHER ANWAR IBRAHIM


MP for Lembah Nurul Izzah Anwar

MP for Lembah Nurul Izzah Anwar

by Nurul Izzah Anwar

Malays speaking without fear
Nurul Izzah AnwarPUTRI REFORMASI MALAYSIA'S FUTURE PRIME MINISTER IN MAKING CAN THEY STOP HER THIS TIME AFTER WHAT DID TO HER FATHER ANWAR IBRAHIM
Nurul Izzah Anwar I can't say that I know Datuk Zaid Ibrahim very well. Our past encounters have been limited to a fleeting hello in front of the steps of my alma mater, the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies in 2006, another chat during a reception in honour of Datuk Ambiga Sreevanesagan in June and, most recently, at the PKR's recent EGM. It's amazing, but perhaps unsurprising that he has in these three years evolved from an ambiguous reformist in Umno into the conscience of all Malaysians.
I had always been impressed by his outspokenness, and his willingness to fearlessly voice out his views on issues of national importance is nothing short of inspirational. Zaid does not mince his words where many hesitate to call a spade a spade, especially where it matters the most.
An articulate Malay speaking out for a multiracial and progressive Malaysia is terribly important in this current political climate. For our own community, Zaid epitomises how the Malays might redefine ourselves, to re-imagine a world where we do not think that we are inferior or threatened but are rather confident in whom we are.
In reading Zaid's book Saya Pun Melayu, I sense the need for Malays to embrace a new paradigm on what it means to be Malay. Many indeed are doing so and this is a heartening. "Malay" need no longer carry connotations of dependency on the state, insecurity or the crippling feeling alienation and the lack of self-worth.
The word "Malay" can and must eventually mean a call to embrace a broader Malaysian identity, along with a true, inclusive nationalism that is proud of who we are individually but also in what we have accomplished together. We can be sure of our identities and yet still be a part of something greater than all of us — and this is something all the ethnic groups in Malaysia ought to aspire to.
Zaid's book highlights that fact that we need to look beyond the stereotypes and take an objective, albeit positive look at our community's accomplishments. We have made great strides in business, the arts, education and the professions. Our success extends from Lembah Pantai where Malays own vibrant businesses selling products made by Malays to the flourishing nasi lemak stalls in Kota Baru.
We attend leading universities throughout the world, increasingly through our own merit. We can count internationally recognised choreographers, painters, cartoonists, writers, and film directors amongst our numbers.
Beyond these markers, our success can more often that not be seen at home through our everyday acts of compassion and sensitivity to others, which spread to our fellow Malaysians to become a national virtue. The kindness shown towards our children, parents and neighbours is perhaps one of the most important signs of who we Malays are as a community. These are real achievements that no one can or would want to take from us.
I'm not denying that we still have a long way to go in moving our community forward, nor am I unmindful that a lot of our successes would not have been in possible without the NEP and its institutions. However, it has become patently obvious that these structures are now holding the Malays back, and that the world has changed since then.
The Malays and, as a-matter-of-fact, all Malaysians need to change as well if we want to remain relevant in this world. We need to step away from our obsession with all things racial and realise that the project of nation-building is not a zero-sum game. Malaysia can never succeed until and unless its entire people feel like they are truly a part of it.
Why then does the old paradigm of ethnic insecurity persist? Why does suspicion and acrimony towards our fellow Malaysians and they towards us still linger? Why are mainstream newspapers calling for ethnic conflict, accusing minority communities of all sorts of ludicrous plots?
The sad reality is that these myths are being perpetuated by Umno and Barisan Nasional for their own gain. The fact is that Umno wants to keep the Malay community under its suzerainty forever. They do this by focusing on what we have supposedly not achieved, rather than acknowledging our gains and potential.
They claim to want to protect and uplift the Malay community, but all they have been doing for the last few years is playing on their fears and prejudices. The same can be said for the Barisan components with the non-Malays. This glass-half-empty mentality is being used by Umno/BN to protect each other and to ward off challenges to their stranglehold on power.
We've seen from the case of Zaid of how Umno demonises anyone who steps out of the pattern of complete loyalty to the party and who have different ideas on how to improve the livelihoods of Malays and Malaysians. We have also as of late seen their scare tactics in action. They have labelled people as "traitors" for calling for a new path of development for Malaysia. They prefer to protect their interests rather than allow the Malaysian people — especially the Malays — to benefit from reform, less corruption and more inclusion.
Umno also regrettably perpetuates the myth that the Malay community is perpetually under threat from their non-Malay counterparts, and that Umno is the only party that can save them from this supposed "servitude". This, rather than anything else, is why race relations have gotten worse in Malaysia.
You cannot expect harmony in a country where its largest ethnic group is constantly bombarded with the message that the minorities are supposedly out to get them and take away their rights. Yet, they chose to follow this tactic since they believe in the short term this will strengthen Umno and bring Malays back to the party.
They use these "attacking" tactics because they cannot offer anything else. They have shown that they would prefer to entrench those in power rather than allow new ideas and reforms to increase our chances for greater success. There is a real danger that their short-sightedness may cost future generations of Malaysians dearly.
The fact is that Malays have nothing to fear. We are demographically the largest ethnic group in Malaysia and the birth rate is going to keep it that way. Our position in the constitution is enshrined and this isn't going to change either.
That is what Umno and the Malay extremists do not get, and what the community as a whole needs to understand. The non-Malays and Malays who challenge Umno are not seeking to reduce the position of the Malays in anyway, but to defend and uplift all Malaysians. We have to understand that we are all tied together and that we all have a stake in the land. We cannot survive individually as Malays, Chinese or Indians but as Malaysians.
Our non-Malay fellow citizens are not "challenging" our rights or "insulting" or culture and religion — rather they are calling for our nascent nationhood to be allowed to achieve it's full potential than for us to remain stuck in our ethnic and mental ghettos. The liberals and moderates amongst the non-Malays also suffer from the depredations of extremists within their own communities — they deserve our support as well. The wave of reactionary politics that is engulfing us can only be turned back if progressive Malaysians stand firm against their threats and untruths.
While it is true that much more needs to be done to address those who have not benefited — for all Malaysians — the focus on what we don't have rather on what we have accomplished only undermines us. We need to imagine a better future, for Malays and Malaysians — this will incidentally make it easier for all of us to achieve what we might lack.



Lingam committing sedition with the help of the Courts!

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 06:28 AM PDT

Lingam on holiday with Eusoff Chin?!?
Two former chief justices Eusoff Chin and Ahmad Fairuz Sheikh Abdul Halim along with lawyer VK Lingam have obtai leave (permission) from the appellate court to challenge the findings of the royal commission on the 'Lingam-gate' incident.

Justice Tengku Baharudin Shah Tengku Mahmud and Zaharah Ibrahim ruled in Lingam's favour while Justices Mohd Hishamudin Mohd Yunus ruled against it.

In May 2008, the inquiry findings had recommended investigation by the authorities on six individuals including the trio over their roles in fixing the appointment of top judges. The others were tycoon Vincent Tan, Umno secretary-general and then minister in the Prime Minister's Department Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor and former premier Dr Mahathir Mohamad.

(from left to right: Mahathir, Eusoff Chin, Tengku Adnan, Lingam, AhmadFairus: Top: Vincent Tan)

Low point in Malaysia's judiciary

Dubbed the 'Lingam tape saga', the disclosure in Sept 2007 by Anwar Ibrahim of a video recording of Lingam in a phone conversation with Fairuz over the brokering of senior judges was one of the lowest points in Malaysia's judicial history after the removal of former lord president Salleh Abbas and four other senior judges in 1988. The royal panel, which called a total of 21 witnesses to testify, found:

  • the video clip was authentic;
  • Lingam was engaged in a phone conversation with Fairuz in the presence of businessman Loh Mui Fah and his son Gwo-Burne (now Kelana Jaya parliamentarian), who took the video;
  • Lingam had directly influenced the elevation of judges, including the appointment of Fairuz as president of the Court of Appeal and, possibly, the latter's further appointment as chief justice;
  • Lingam to have asked Tan and Adnan to be actively involved in the appointment of judges, in particular the appointment of Fairuz as chief judge of Malaya and subsequently, president of the Court of Appeal;
  • The phone conversation indicated Lingam's "uncanny knowledge" of what could be considered as matters classified as being under the Official Secrets Act; and
  • Adnan could have been Lingam's 'source' in the Prime Minister's Department.

Lingam, who represented himself yesterday, had submitted that he has a right to clear his name (through the judiciary).

However members of the judiciary (judges) should be the last ones qualified to judge because this corruption case involves the judiciary itself!

How much integrity is there for the judges to tell the world that Lingam is innocent when they themselves are corrupted?

This decision by the court of appeal (allowing Lingam to challenge the findings of the royal commission) has made a mockery of justice and it has set a dangerous precedent.

Is the Court of Appeal now saying that the High Court has supervisory jurisdiction over a Royal Commission of Inquiry?

The RCI's powers are derived from a specific Act of Parliament, the Commission of Inquiry Act 1950. It is not an inferior tribunal or administrative body that is amenable to judicial review.

The RCI reports directly to the King. It merely makes recommendations and findings based on its terms of reference and after considering the evidence.

The Government then decides on whether to give effect to the recommendations and findings of the RCI.

These recommendations and findings are not binding on the Government and they do not have the force of law.

They are subject to implementation or enforcement by the Government. Therefore, the recommendations and findings of the RCI being non-binding in nature and not enforceable in law cannot be termed as a decision that affects the rights of aggrieved or interested parties.

Lingam right to be heard should have been at the Royal Commission and not by the courts who are clearly part of the scandal!

By challenging the Royal Commission that was carried out under the King's order, isn't Lingam committing sedition! It is for the King to accept the findings of the RCI and not Lingam.

If the King does not like the findings, the King can choose to reject the findings! Who is Lingam to challenge this findings?

Under section 3(1) of the Sedition Act, a seditious tendency are acts with a tendency:

(a) to bring into hatred or contempt or to excite disaffection against any Ruler or against any Government

I agreed with Kapal Singh, Lingam should be prosecuted for sedition, for bringing the judiciary to disrepute and breaching professional conduct stipulated under the Legal Profession Act and now for challenging the King's findings!


Source from Malaysiakini


Umno Youth condemns faeces-throwing act

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 04:08 AM PDT

Umno Youth today strongly condemned a demonstration in front of the Malaysian embassy in Jakarta yesterday where some protestors threw human faeces into the mission's compound and others stomped on the Malaysian flag and smeared it with faeces. More
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Jamal's chequered ties with Chua

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 03:11 AM PDT

EXCLUSIVE Never mind that Ibrahim Ali-led Perkasa wants MCA president Dr Chua Soi Lek put away under the Internal Security Act. As far as suspended 988.fm radio disc jockey Jamaluddin Ibrahim is concerned, the Pasir Mas MP and Chua (left) are just two sides of the same coin. In fact the MCA man is even worse, he caustically said during an interview with Malaysiakini yesterday. "At least Ibrahim Ali does not touch on issues of religion," he said, still smarting over Chua's statement which reminded the deejay, a Muslim, to act appropriately in the holy month of Ramadan. Full story here: www.malaysiakini.com
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Time: 07:50 More in News & Politics


Ramadan fare everywhere!

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 03:09 AM PDT

Ramadan is a special month for Muslims. The holiest month in the Islamic calender, it is where Muslims fast from daybreak to sunset to let themselves experience the hardship of those less fortunate, committing themselves to doing good deeds and prayers as well as exercising restraint. However, there is a flip side to all this seriousness. A fun side in the form of the Ramadan Bazzar which takes place for one month every every year im Ramadan. It is a utopia for food lovers, where assortments of delicacies are presented for the breaking of fast -- not for self-indulgence but for convenience. Muslims and non-Muslims alike flock to these bazaars to savour the culinary colours of Malaysia. Reporter: Hazlan Zakaria Camera & editing: Cal-Vin Cheah Additional footage: Amir Abdullah & CJ Arvind Raj Producer: Shufiyan Shukur
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Kuala Lumpur Sights and Scenes Ramadhan 1431 AH / 2010 CE. Part 1

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 04:21 AM PDT

You have yet to know about Kuala Lumpur if you have yet to step foot around its old quarters namely around Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman and Chow Kit?


Why do I say that?


Well, this is where the true pulse of Kuala Lumpur throbs with a vibration of life, with its sights and smells, both pleasant and revolting at the same time.


The old parts of Kuala Lumpur's main artery of life resonates with the cacophony of the various sounds of the city folk going about their business especially around the Chow Kit Wet Market area.


This is where the majority of Kuala Lumpur city dwellers come to buy their groceries needs and also shop for bargain fresh fish, poultry, beef, mutton and all kinds of vegetables, fresh fruits, preserves, etcetera. The entire area is populated and run by Indonesians and a few Bangladeshis. 


There are a few Malaysian Malays and Chinese who own some shops in the old traditional market.


Most of the stall helpers are Indonesian migrants. When I spoke to some of the Indonesian stall traders and helpers, they were lamenting of slow business and how the usual crowd of Raya shoppers have yet to come and how that affects their income for they are paid based on sales done?


Yet I read the newspapers that show groups of Indonesians protesting against our country in front of our Malaysian Embassy in Jakarta, trampling upon our national flag and desecrating it with their faeces and hurling such filth into our embassy's compounds!


Are these people stir crazy?


Who's gonna suffer if we ~ our government decide that enough is enough and expel their citizens out of our country?


Indonesia will have an unprecedented national economic crisis as a result!


But then again, Malaysia is ruled by softies and throughout our nation's history, this country's government has never had it in them to be rough to anyone.


Must be the Malay's tendency to give face after face after face......


That's why the Malays are in such dire straits today in most areas?


Ahh..back to my topic...


KL as it is ....for those of us who frequent the traditional markets and old shopping areas namely Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman and its vicinities...


Here are the photos I took this morning stretching to mid afternoon...


To start my morning photo shoot cum walkabout after having settled my marketing, I parked near this area. 
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This trader is now familiar to me and she was quite earnest in asking me to snap her photo today. Hehehehe....looks like I will have to start charging them. :P
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Next to catch my attention was this Indonesian baby boy who scrutinized my camera lenses and wondered as to 'who is this old man pointing his camera at me?'
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Just behind the stall were these two lasses playing. They are the baby boy's sisters. As usual, they posed cheekily for me.
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The younger sister is very playful and showed her joy at being photographed.
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I then came upon this baldie who eyed me warily....hehehehe
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A short distance away was this stall selling Indonesian sarongs.
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I came across this lass preparing for business by arranging her bags for sale.
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The tudung 'express' seller was at her usual spot. Her tudungs were on sale for RM5.00 each.
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There was this mother trying on a woven skullcap for her young son. For Aidil Fitri prayers. :)
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I then came across baby Dominique being carried by his mother and attracting quite a lot of attention. You know how we all go goo goo ga ga over babies? Hehehehe...Dominique was receiving quite a whole lot of fans attentions this morning. The fella looked sleepy...
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I'm sorry Dominique! Who can resist lavishing attention on a cute lil' one such as you? :P
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Further along the path in between the shops, I met this serious looking Indonesian girl. She was looking very curiously at my camera so I promptly snapped this shot of her.
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The granddaughter of the Indonesian petai seller. This man is very friendly and I have come to know him for quite some time now. He sells the petai at RM5 for 3 bunches. Quite cheap I must say! Petai is good for diabetics, heart patients, etc.
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A perspective shot of the pathway between the shops and Dominique with his mom.
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Approaching the entrance to the Chow Kit Wet Market. Here, the fruit traders shout themselves hoarse plying their fruits. During Ramadhan, their din is quite subdued... if not they will be trying to out shout the other in their sales pitch! :D
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Here are their push carts laden with all kinds of tropical fruits. They add color and excitement to the whole place. All of them are from Indonesia. The locals are only the Chinese fruit stall owners who employ Indonesians to sell their fruits. Indonesians and Bangladeshis. No local helpers.
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A skyview shot with the umbrellas and push carts in the scope.
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Turning around, I snapped this shot of the petai seller's daughter and a very pregnant cat dozing besides her. She was selling maize.
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Leaving the area, I walked along Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman and behind the rows of makeshift stalls selling all kinds of festive items came across this vagabond fast asleep in his office chair. The guy looked quite tough and maybe is mentally unstable. I took care not to wake him up from his sleep and snapped this shot.
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If you look closely, he is wearing a necklace made up of soft drink cans tabs. Creative, huh?
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I then chanced upon this prewar shophouse with exposed bricks and peeling plaster. Quite picturesque, don't you agree?
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Farmasi Britain. :)
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This used to be a budget restaurant where they sold food for just RM2 per serving. I saw their banners as I often drove by. Naturally selling food so cheaply saw them go out of business very quickly. It doesn't work, underselling! You will sink faster than HMS Titanic! :P
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This is interesting! An Indian Muslim briyani restaurant with its signature 786 embellished prominently on their signage. Numerological fiends! Untreatable!
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Closer shot of their signage.
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Another view of the old shophouses dating back to the prewar era.
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Time is running out for Najib's 1Malaysia

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 07:59 AM PDT

From Christoph Kupper, via e-mail

I refer to your article, 'Najib's 1 'sick' Malaysia limps towards Merdeka'. Funny. In 1998, everyone raised the Malaysian flags on their cars on Merdeka day.

Today, hardly anyone does and if they do, they are unfortunately mostly Malays. The discrepancy in society is very obvious to foreigners. Despite '1Malaysia'. This is quite a sad fact.

But as foreigner again, it is very hard to understand, how one can promote a '1Malaysia' campaign, with all the quotas and regulations still in place that prefer certain races over others; a concept quite obviously not made to believe into '1Malaysia' at all.

A very, very bold step is needed to make Malaysia what it could be: One of the prime countries in the region. The country has all it takes. Minus the political courage and will... and time is running out.

Read:

Najib's 1 'sick'Malaysia limps towards Merdeka



A cool letter to Uthaya and PKR

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 07:59 AM PDT

From Mrs Malaprop, via e-mail

PKR did not strategise their campaign in Hulu Selangor to the max. The Indians support for PKR was split and widespread as noted earlier. The Indians are an emotional lot and PKR needs someone smart and savvy and politically intelligent to move them.

Of course, speaking in Tamil is a distinct advantage. In short, PKR needs an Indian to mobilise and garner their support. The Hindraf lawyer, Uthayakumar is an excellent choice and much respected in the rural areas.

The problem is both PKR and Hindraf have an ego problem, a big one at that. Both think that each is trying to get the advantage of the other. PKR thinks that by calling Hindraf to the table, they would be seen as 'kow-towing' to them and Hindraf thinks the same.

Both of them haven't heard of the idiom 'pride goeth before a fall' and thus Hulu Selangor was the casualty.

Just as DAP had a big problem reconciling with PAS (remember Karpal Singh's outburst of 'over his dead body') - they had no choice but to bite the bullet in the end and managed to come around eventually.

Lots of hiccups and slaps along the way and it didn't help that Umno was always using this as an anology for a marriage of convenience, etc, etc to taunt them. Still, by and large, they managed to rein in their followers, used their brains and now both DAP and PAS support each other.

Its now PKR and Hindraf's turn to do the same. Uthayakumar should be made to understand that he cannot change the situation of the Indians with just his party alone. As it is, Hindraf has split on many levels and the original five are no longer in the same picture.

On the other hand, it would be understandable if he thinks PKR is just wanting to make use of him for their advantage just for the elections and leave him high and dry the day after. Uthaya is not stupid and don't underestimate his capability either.

Whichever way you look at it, it was because of him and his party that brought about the massive electoral gains in 2008. Indians in Malaysia rallied behind him and that is no small matter. Samy Vellu couldn't even have tried to get that kind of support in all his years as a bloody politician, even with all his money.

PKR definitely needs the Indian support and Uthaya and Co definitely need PKR's base if he wants to still help the Indians. It was a wrong tactical move on Hindraf's part to issue an ultimatum before the Hulu Selangor by-election and it was also not good planning and strategy for PKR to have ignored Uthaya for the by-election .

The Indians are unlike the Chinese. The Indians are grappling with poverty levels in the land of plenty but the Chinese have overcome that through their approach in thinking, hardworking nature and education.

The Indians, on the other hand, (specifically the rural ones) are basically an emotional lot, are semi literate, bogged down by their inability to rise above their level, mired in their own little world, and are not exposed to the outside world beyond the estates they live in.

They are a sad and forgotten lot waiting to be exploited by politicians who throw some crumbs, give them real money which they haven't seen except maybe every four years, add in some goodies like foodstuff and new clothes and they're very happy to vote for the idiots.

Any politician worth his salt, wouldn't talk of equality and economics to this bunch of people. They need to be fed first, literally, then only, be shown how to fish later on their own. When they have met all these, talk to them of the inequality and lopsided discriminatory policies being perpetrated by the BN/MIC/Umno. Their vote will be yours for the asking. Don't forget to check their voting status/registration too

It's a tall order, but hey! that's what government policies and politicians are for, isn't it? To help the 'rakyat' . The Indian 'rakyat' needs a massive dose of help so go ahead and do it sincerely and genuinely.

Just to make a point, how come the Tamil school in Hulu Selangor had no electricity and the PKR government was unaware of this basic need? What was the MP/ ADUN of the area doing for the last two years? It takes more than two years to identify this in his own turf?

It's no point blaming the Umno/MIC fellas and the Indians in Hulu Selangor. If the Selangor PKR government/ground staff/politicians could have done this earlier or at least, identified all rural citizens, Malay, Indians, Chinese, Orang Asli, etc, through their respective assemblymen/MPs and started this basic policy from the time they came into power, this embarrassing defeat would not have happened.

PKR needs to prioritise its objectives and really get going if they still want to go to Putrajaya. Like RPK said in Malaysia Today, massive crowds at campaigns doesn't translate into massive votes! The sooner PKR learns this, the better.

Start fulfilling the basic needs of all strata of society – emphasise on the rural population. They are the ones with the large families and extended members who translate into votes. The urban ones know who to vote but don't disregard them either!


Kudos to Pakatan Rakyat, shame on Hindraf!

Posted: 24 Aug 2010 07:58 AM PDT

From Chandra Bose, via e-mail

The Sitiawan Dindings Indian Association matter goes to show that Pakatan Rakyat representatives are more effective champions of the rakyat.

Education Minister Muhyiddin Yassin has agreed to cancel the acquisition of the 2.2ha land belonging to the Dindings Indian Association in Manjung for a school project.

The hard work put in by M Kulasegaran, Prof P Ramasamy and P Gobalakrishnan with the support of Indians in the district contributed to stopping the land from being taken over by the federal government.

It was the pressure exerted by the rakyat that eventually forced the committee and the MIC to rescind the move. If the Pakatan Rakyat had not taken the initiative, the land would have been surely sold to the federal government, and the property as a landmark for Indians, would have been lost forever.

What is most glaring is the fact that the so-called Indian 'champions' Hindraf/HRP-Makkal Sathi Party was completely silent on this matter. This so-called vociferous spokesorganisation of Indians have lately become quite docile in taking Indian issues.

In the case of Bukit Jalil estate, HRP merely agitiated for the workers without working out a solution for them.

They are quite vehement in their criticism of Pakatan Rakyat, they refuse to say anything about the MIC.


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